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    My Journey through the Astronomical Year

    Think of this as a "companion text" to this, the main web site. Not required reading, butI hope you'll find it interesting and helpful.

Events, June 2014 – Bright Lights Along the Ecliptic this Month

This is a great month to become familiar with the ecliptic in our sky. The ecliptic is the plane of our solar system where you will always find the Sun, Moon, and Planets.

Finding it sounds simple – and it is if you pick your time and date. The problem is it changes constantly because the Earth is tilted on its axis and revolving around the Sun.  I should stress one more thing – the ecliptic is not the path you will see the Sun, Moon, and planets take across the sky in a given night – it is the path they will follow as they change position over days, weeks, and even years. How quickly an object follows this path depends on how close it is to us – the Moon makes it completely around the ecliptic each month, the Sun each year – but a distant planet, such as Saturn, takes about 30 years.

You can trace the portion of this path visible about an hour after sunset on a June night in 2014. For the chart below I chose June 13th simply to include a nearly full Moon in the picture. It will, of course, change position each night – but the planets will stick pretty close to these general spots all month. So go out an hour or so after sunset and start your search by looking to the northwest for brilliant Jupiter. It will be brighter than any star, or any of the other planets and only about 10 degrees above the horizon – ten degrees can be measured by holding your closed fist at arms length.

Jupiter thus achors the western end of the ecliptic. We’ll move eastward to trace out the rest of it.

Click on this chart to get a much larger version. (Prepared from Starry Nights Pro screen shot.)

Click on this chart to get a much larger version. (Prepared from Starry Nights Pro screen shot.)

 

Up above Jupiter are the famous Gemini Twins – the nearer and slightly brighter one is Pollux, the other is Castor.

Turn a bit south of west you will find the bright star Regulus. While it outshines most other stars visible tonight, it is just in between Castor and Pollux in brightness and is about 30 degrees above the horizon – three fists.

Next on our list is the red planet Mars – the second brightest object on our chart. If you’re not detecting the rusty redness of it, try looking at it in binoculars. Then compare it with the next bright star on our chart, Spica. Spica is a  little lower than Mars an quite a bit dimmer. (Mats is four fist high, Spica about three and half.) Spica, however, is a very hot – and thus very blue – star. Look at the difference in color between it and Mars.

Moving eastward you’ll find Saturn, whose beautiful rings will show in even a small telescope. However, to the naked eye and binoculars Saturn simply looks like a bright star – not as bright as Mars, but certainly brighter than Spica. It has a pale, yellowish hue.

Continuing to the east is Antares, just 15-degrees – a fist and a half – above the horizon.  It’s name means “rival to Mars” and for good reason – it is a classic, red star, rivaling the color of Mars.  Again, contrast its color with that of Spica and Mars.

Oh – high overhead is the bright star Arcturus. It’s about as bright as Saturn and nearly 70 degrees above the horizon – seven fists.  Do you remember how to find Arcturus? You “follow the arc” of the Big Dipper’s handle – now high in our northern sky, to Arcturus, then “drive a spike” to Spica.

What else is going on this month?

Well, two dates to keep in mind:

The Summer Solstice is June 21 at 6:57 am EDT – and thus begins the longest day of the year.

On June 24 a thin crescent Moon will be very close to the brightest of planets, Venus in the eastern sky about an hour before sunrise. Should be a pretty sight and a nice picture opportunity.

Look East: March 2014 Roars in like a sickle and triangle! (Huh?)

Sure, I’d like to tell you March roars in like a lion – but honestly it’s easier to point to the sickle and the triangle and the “Little King” we call Regulus, this last being the new guidepost star for March. But there is a lion there, too. Let’s look at the sickle and triangle first, though, because they’re two very easy asterisms you’ll see in the east about an hour or so after sunset. The Big Dipper off to the northeast gives you an idea of size for comparison – and the same pointer stars you use inthe DIpper to point to the north star – they can be used to point inthe opposite direction where they come very close to Regulus, about 45 degrees away.

This is the eastern sky as it will appear about an hour after sunset from mid-northern latitudes. Click image for larger view. Prepared from Starry Nights Pro screen shot.

This is the eastern sky as it will appear about an hour after sunset from mid-northern latitudes. Click image for larger view. Prepared from Starry Nights Pro screen shot.

Click for printer friendly version of the above chart.

OK – so can you make this into a lion? I find it fairly easy if I consider the sickle his head and mane – and I consider the triangle his rear haunches. I leave the rest to my imagination and don’t really attempt to connect the dots.

Leo does look much like the Lion depicted inthe 1603 Bayer catalog.  Click image for larger version.

The stars of Leo do indeed trace out some key parts of the Lion depicted in this plate from the 1603 Bayer atlas. (Click image for larger view.) Note that the bright star that marks the tail is named “Denobola,” which in Arabic really does mean “tail.” We encounter this also in the tail of Cygnus the Swan where the bright star is named “Deneb.” The Arabic star names are frequently descriptive. (Image courtesy of Linda Hall library of Science, Engineering and Technology.)

Regulus, our new bright guidepost star for this month, means “little king,” or “prince,” in Latin. That fits right in with the lion‘s reputation as King of the Beasts. And what a lovely image to have a prince leading a lion onto the night-time stage this month!

Is Regulus memorable in its own right? Well yes. It’s a star that is spinning so fast that if we could see its disc, it would look like a beach ball that someone sat on. It takes Regulus about 16 hours to make one rotation – in comparison, our Sun, a smaller star, takes about a month to rotate. In fact, if Regulus were spinning just a bit faster, it would spin itself apart!

The rapid spinning gives Regulus an equatorial diameter that is about one-third bigger than its polar diameter. This also results in the polar regions of Regulus being much hotter than its equator.

Regulus is also a multiple star system, but as such rather dull visually. The second star in the system is much fainter, so it can barely be detected by a skilled observer using binoculars – and in a telescope it’s so far away from the primary star that the two stars don’t seem like a pair at all. Both these stars are spectroscopic doubles – meaning the companions are so close we can’t see them with a telescope.

Though a relatively young star – about 250 million years as compared to the five-billion-year age of our Sun – Regulus is apparently nearing the end of its normal life as a “main sequence” star. That is, it’s about to finish burning hydrogen, which means it will soon go into the last stages of its life. But according to Jim Kaler, Regulus is also a curious case. It appears to have a very close white dwarf companion which scientists believe once was much larger and brighter than Regulus. But the gases were drawn from the white dwarf into Regulus, making Regulus both huge and bright and causing it to spin the way it does.

In total, Regulus is another example of how what looks like a common star to us, is quite fascinating when seen in the light of modern science.

Vital stats for Regulus:

• Brilliance: Magnitude 1.35, 22nd among the brightest stars in our sky; shines with the luminosity of about 150 Suns.
• Distance: 77 light years
• Spectral Type: B7V
• Position: 10h:08m:22s, +11°:58′:02

The buzz about the Beehive (M44) and Leo’s whiskers – a binocular treat!

In ancient times the constellation Leo extended much farther east and west, and M44 was considered to be its whiskers.

from “The Next Step – Finding and Viewing Messier Object” by Ken Graun

Whiskers indeed! I like that. It’s a great way to remember where to look for M44, for if you can find the Sickle – the huge head and mane of Leo – then all you have to think is “now where would his whiskers be?” Scan 2-3 binocular fields in that direction – westward – and you should soon stumble upon M44, the Beehive. Here is a chart you can use to find it. Do wait  until about two hours after sunset when it is really dark and M44 is well up in the sky.

Click image for larger view. Prepared from Starry Nights Pro screen shot.

Click here to download a black-on-white (printer-friendly) version of this chart.

M44 also is known as “the Beehive,” and Praesepe, which is Latin for manger. And if you have dark skies, away from light pollution, you will see this as a small, wispy cloud, perhaps suggestive of Leo’s whiskers. It is, in fact, a beautiful star cluster as binoculars or a small telescope will reveal. Galileo first discovered its true nature, and in this hazy patch counted more than 40 stars. You should see about that many with your binoculars. This is one of the nearest star clusters to us, and although there is still debate over its exact distance, it is around 580 light years. That compares with about 400 light years for the Pleiades. The two clusters are pretty close to the same size, but M44 is considered much older. M45 – the Pleiades – is estimated to be 78 million years old, while M44 is thought to be about 660 million years old. As star ages go, they’re both quite young. But open clusters, such as these, do not last too long – the members stars tend to get drawn off by close encounters with other stars as the whole clusters moves about our Milky Way galaxy.

The Latin name, Praesepe, is worth examining because it explains the names of two relatively bright stars which flank it – Asellus Borealis and Asellus Australis. Borealis means “northern” and Australis means “southern.” Asellus means “ass” – as in donkey – and Praesepe means “crib” or “manger.” In other words, the Beehive apparently looked to some like a pile of hay in a manger, and these two flanking stars were donkeys eating that hay, one to the north and one to the south. In binoculars the scene should look something like this.

M44 and surroundings as it would appear in binoculars with a 5-degree field of view. Click image for larger view. (Chart derived from Starry Nights software screen shot.)

Click here to download a printer-friendly version of this chart.

The two donkeys are about as bright as the stars in the handle of the Little Dipper, so under dark skies should be faintly visible to the naked eye with the northern one the dimmest. The third star, Eta Cancri, is dimmer still. Its name, however, indicates that it, the Beehive, and other stars shown here are all part of the rather obscure constellation known as Cancer, the crab.

Look East in February 2014: Two dogs – plus Jupiter – rising in a star-spangled spectacular – the Winter Hexagon

We have two “dog stars” on the southeastern horizon early on February evenings  – Sirius and Procyon – and  both are part of what is certainly the brightest, star-spangled  section of our northern night sky – the Winter Hexagon.  Adding to this annual dazzle in 2014 – and brighter than any star – is the “wandering star” (i.e., planet) Jupiter, smack in the middle of the Gemini twins -about halfway between their heads and feet.

Here’s how the Winter Hexagon looked to the camera of Jimmy Westlake who took this gorgeous shot as it loomed over Stagecoach, Colorado, USA.  You may not see the faint band of the Milky Way shown here if you live in a light polluted region, but you certainly should be able to pick out the bright stars that outline the Hexagon, as well as the Pleiades star cluster visible near the top and just right of center.

Click on image for much larger view! (Copyright © 2007-2011 JRWjr Astrophotography. All rights reserved.)

Look carefully at that photo, then compare it with this star chart, which is what we see from mid-northern latitudes as we look southeast early on a February evening.

Click image for much larger version. To get the full beauty of this section of sky find an area with a clear horizon to the southeast and go out on a February evening a couple of hours after sunset. The chart shows what you'll see. The link below provides a small black-on-white version you can print and take into the field. (Prepared from a Stellarium screen shot.)

Click image for much larger version. To get the full beauty of this section of sky find an area with a clear horizon to the southeast and go out on a February evening a couple of hours after sunset. The chart shows what you’ll see. The link below provides a small black-on-white version you can print and take into the field. (Prepared from a Stellarium screen shot.)

For a printer-friendly version of this chart, click here.

People in the north tend to think that the stars are brighter in winter because the air is so cool and crisp. That certainly could be a factor. But the simple fact is our winter sky is dominated by a whole lot of very bright stars. In fact, visible from earth are 22 stars of first magnitude. Sixteen  of these are visible from the Northern Hemisphere, and half of these are visible in the area of the Winter Hexagon on a February evening. That means nearly all these bright stars are jammed into a space taking up less than one-quarter of the February night sky – which is  just one-eighth of the total night sky we can see through the year! In other words, if bright stars like these were scattered throughout the night sky evenly there would be 64 first magnitude stars instead of just 22. Add to that the seven bright stars of the Big Dipper being dragged up the northeastern sky by the Great Bear on a February evening, and it is no wonder that in the dead of a northern winter our skies offer a lively, colorful, star-spangled spectacular.

The Hexagon alone contains seven of the first magnitude stars in our sky and an eighth that is the brightest second magnitude star we see. This one – Castor – just misses being first magnitude by a hair.  And nearby is Adhara, a star that sits right on the border between second and first magnitude; plus Regulus, another first magnitude star, is rising low in the east. Whew! That’s a lot. Let’s review.  Going  counterclockwise and starting at the bottom, the Hexagon’s corners are marked by:

  • Sirius, the brightest, and at about eight light years one of the closest, stars in our sky – except the Sun, of course.
  • Rigel, the blue giant that marks one of Orion’s feet.
  • Aldebaran, the brilliant orange star that is the eye of Taurus the Bull and dominates the nearest open star cluster, the Hyades.
  • Capella, now high overhead, is really a complex of four stars that we see as one.
  • Castor and Pollux, the twins, one of which (Pollux) is first magnitude, while Castor is the brightest second magnitude star we see.
  • Procyon, the “Little Dog” star, which is dim only in comparison to Sirius, the “Big Dog.”

And . . .

  • Inside the Hexagon is another first magnitude star, Betelgeuse, the red giant that marks Orion’s shoulder, not to mention the three bright stars of Orion’s Belt – all second magnitude.
  • Regulus, the “Little King,” is a first magnitude star that is rising in the east and bringing us the familiar sickle of bright stars that mark the head of the lion. We’ll study it closely next month.
  • Adhara is the western-most star of the distinctive small triangle of stars beneath Sirius. At magnitude 1.5 I call it a first magnitude star, but others consider this second magnitude. So depending on how you count Adhara there are either 21 or 22 first magnitude stars.

Before leaving the Winter Hexagon, I must stress that  this is not simply a northern hemisphere show – if you live  in Sydney, Australia, you could just rename this the “Summer Hexagon.” I see these stars in the southeast – my friends in Sydney see them in the northeast of their sky – and, of course, since they’re “standing on their heads,” they see them a bit differently – something like this!

The “Winter Hexagon” becomes the “Summer Hexagon” in the Southern Hemisphere, but contains all the same bright stars. (Chart prepared from Starry Nights Pro screen shot.)

February Guidepost Stars

Of the stars mentioned so far, the two dog stars, Sirius and Procyon, plus the fence sitter, Adhara, are the guidepost stars to learn this month. They are the ones you can spot near the southeastern horizon, coming into view about 45 minutes to an hour after sunset. (We’ll have more to say about Regulus next month, and the other stars mentioned we’ve met in previous months.) To see the February guidepost stars – and the asterism of the Virgins –  look low in the southeast about 45 minutes to an hour after sunset.  Here’s what you should see.

Click image for larger version. This chart shows the three guidepost stars for February as they appear about an hour after sunset in the southeast. Sirius is the brightest star we see and Procyon is not far behind, but Adhara is not much brighter than its companions, which form a distinctive, small triangle the ancient Arabs knew simply as “the Virgins.” (Prepared from Starry Nights Pro screen shot.)

For a printer-friendly version of this chart, click here.

Procyon, the seventh brightest star we see, is first up in our sky, and thus the highest, of these three. To the southeast and a tad lower is brilliant Sirius, brightest star in our sky, and next to the North Star, Polaris, probably the best known star in the world. Adhara is the brightest star in the “Virgins,” a simple,  distinctive  triangle asterism. But, of course, Sirius is dominant – far brighter than any other star we see in our night sky. I always think of Sirius as the eye of the great dog and as he sits, the triangle seems to be his rear haunches. From our perspective Adhara may be just another bright star, but of these three it is really the brightest by far – it’s just much farther away than the other two.  If we compared them side by side we would find that Procyon shines with the light of seven Suns, Sirius 23, and Adhara has a luminosity to the eye of 3,700 Suns! Now that’s bright.  And in another way, Adhara reveals our human bias, for if we had ultraviolet vision Adhara would be the brightest star in our sky, not Sirius. But again – that’s not the way we see it. From our perspective, Sirius and Procyon are very bright because they are very close to Earth. Sirius, at a little more than eight light years is the closest star that we in the mid-northern latitudes see in our night sky. Procyon, at about 11 light years, is fourteenth on the list of nearest stars.  Most of the stars that are nearer than Procyon are also much fainter – in fact, too faint to see with the naked eye. If we count just those stars bright enough to see with the naked eye, Procyon is the sixth closest and Sirius is the second closest.  (The closest star, Alpha Centauri, is visible only to those in, or near, the Southern Hemisphere.) But Adhara? Adhara is 405  light years away – about the same distance as the North Star, Polaris. Sirius will frequently seem to be changing colors, but that’s just the effect of our atmosphere. Just as our atmosphere makes our Sun look red when it is rising or setting, it makes any bright star near the horizon appear to dance and change colors rapidly.

The Big Dog as Johannes Bayer depicted him in 1603. (Image courtesy of Linda Hall library of Science, Engineering and Technology.)
The Little Dog as shown in the 1603 Uranometria chart. (Image courtesy of Linda Hall library of Science, Engineering and Technology.)

Sirius is known as a “dog star” because it is the brightest star of the classic constellation, Canis Major – the Big Dog. Procyon is the brightest star in the constellation Canis Minor, the Little Dog. When you look at these constellations as depicted in early star charts, it’s hard to see how connecting the dots makes the stars take the forms the constellation’s name implies, but the images are still useful memory joggers.

Modern science, though, gives us even more reason to remember these two stars, or rather the faint companion stars that orbit them. These are designated Procyon B and Sirius B and they defy our ability to even imagine because there’s just nothing in our down-to-earth experiences that compare with these tiny stars.  One of these “pups”  – the one belonging to Procyon – is impossible to see with a backyard telescope and the other an extreme challenge.  The reason is they are quite dim and being very close to the bright stars, get lost in the glare.

But the mystery of these two fainter stars is that they are both white, indicating they are among the hottest of stars. So how could something be that hot, that close to us, and yet so dim? And the answer is more mind-boggling than the question – they are both white dwarfs, and white dwarfs are a class of stars far denser than anything we encounter on Earth. Now I always find talk of the density of stars counter-intuitive because it gets drilled into our heads that stars are gas and the gas we encounter in our daily lives is anything but dense!  In fact, it’s quite – well – gaseous!  To appreciate this, let’s take a close look at our own Sun.

Click image for larger view.Sirius – with Sirius B at lower left.  Credit: NASA, H.E. Bond and E. Nelan (Space Telescope Science Institute, Baltimore, Md.); M. Barstow and M. Burleigh (University of Leicester, U.K.); and J.B. Holberg (University of Arizona)

The Sun is a ball of gas which reaches densities that near the center are sixteen times that of lead!  That alone should stretch your mind. But now imagine the white dwarf. The stuff that makes up a white dwarf is about one million times denser than the stuff in the Sun.

Jim Kaler writes that if you had a billiard ball made up of the stuff of one of these white dwarfs it would weigh about 70 tons – roughly the weight of an M1 Abrams tank. (Think of what that would do to your pool table, not to mention your foot if it fell on it!)

We know this because we can calculate the mass of the stars by their orbit around their bigger, brighter companions. The result is, we end up with a mass roughly that of the Sun but a size roughly that of the Earth. You can fit one million Earths – and therefore one million white dwarfs – inside the Sun. (See why a white dwarf is one million times as dense as the Sun?)

How do you take all that mass and squeeze it down to such a small size? The physics of how that’s done goes way beyond me, but if you want to put a name to it, a white dwarf consists of “degenerate matter.” Unlike other stars, white dwarfs no longer burn with nuclear fires. In fact, they are no longer burning at all. They are the dying embers of stars – and in the case of the “pups,” the embers are being seen while still white hot. But they will eventually cool.

The name white dwarfs is given to this class of stars, but in truth not all white dwarfs are white – some can even be red. To make sense of this contradiction of terms, just think about an ordinary dying ember and how its color will change as it cools. So it is with these dying stars. Unable to generate any heat, what they radiate they lose.

This is also the ultimate fate scientists expect for our Sun.  As it eventually exhausts its nuclear energy, it will turn into a bloated red giant like Betelgeuse in Orion.  Later still it will blow off its outer shell of gases, turning into a planetary nebula, such as the Ring Nebula (M57) in Lyra.  And at the core of that nebula will be the dying ember we know as a white dwarf.

I’ve never seen the white dwarf that revolves around Sirius, but perhaps this season I will. Orbits are not circles, but ellipses. This means that sometimes there’s more distance between Sirius and its “pup” than at other times – and we happen to be in a period of several years when that distance will be growing, and so it will become easier to see the pup in a good, backyard telescope. (Sirius B completes an orbit around Sirius A in 50.2 years. Procyon B, while visible to professionals, is just simply too difficult a target for most backyard telescopes.) I also plan to take a close look at Adhara with a telescope, for it has a 7.5 magnitude companion just 7 arcseconds away. This should be a challenge – because of the difference in brightness of the two –  but not nearly the challenge that seeing the companion of Sirius is. For those with binoculars and small telescopes, some of the most fascinating objects are in this general area of sky, near, or inside the Winter Hexagon, including the Pleiades, the great Orion Nebula, and the spectacular telescopic open clusters in Gemini and Auriga, M35, M36, M37, and M38. All that star light certainly can make for bright nights during the dark  of a northern winter.

Vital Stats for the Guidepost Stars

For Procyon:

  • Brilliance: Magnitude 0.38, the 7th brightest star in our sky. Shines with the luminosity of about 7 Suns.
  • Distance: 11.4 light years
  • Spectral Type: F
  • Position: 07h:39m:18s, +5°:13′:29″
  • Procyon B is magnitude 10.7 and orbits Procyon in 40.8 years.  It can be as close as 9 AU to Procyon (1 AU is the distance between the Earth and Sun), or as far as  21 AU.

For Sirius:

  • Brilliance: Magnitude -1.5,  the brightest star in our sky.  Shines with the luminosity of about 23 Suns.
  • Distance: 8.6 light years
  • Spectral Type: A
  • Position: 06h:45m:09s, -16°:42′:58″
  • Sirius B is magnitude 8.3 and orbits Sirius in 50.2 years. It can be as close as 8.1 AU to Sirius, or as far as 31.5 AU. (It will reach this greatest separation in 2019.)

For Adhara:

  • Brilliance: Magnitude 1.5, it has a luminosity to the eye of 3500 times that of the Sun! (In other words, much brighter, really, than Procyon or Sirius.)
  • Distance: 405 light years
  • Spectral Type: B2
  • Position: 06h:59m, -28°:59′:18″

Look East: March 2013 Roars in like a sickle and triangle! (Huh?)

Sure, I’d like to tell you March roars in like a lion – but honestly it’s easier to point to the sickle and the triangle and the “Little King” we call Regulus, this last being the new guidepost star for March. But there is a lion there, too. Let’s look at the sickle and triangle first, though, because they’re two very easy asterisms you’ll see in the east about an hour or so after sunset. The Big Dipper off to the northeast gives you an idea of size for comparison.

This is the eastern sky as it will appear about an hour after sunset from mid-northern latitudes. The circle represents a typical field of view for low power binoculars. While you should see the brightest stars easily, in twilight - or in typical light pollution - you'll find that binoculars will show some of the fainter stars nearby and help you be sure you have identified the correct bright star.  The Mars position is for the 15th, but it will change a little each night.  Click image for larger view. Prepared from Starry Nights Pro screen shot.

This is the eastern sky as it will appear about an hour after sunset from mid-northern latitudes. Click image for larger view. Prepared from Starry Nights Pro screen shot.

Click for printer friendly version of the above chart.

OK – so can you make this into a lion? I find it fairly easy if I consider the sickle his head and mane – and I consider the triangle his rear haunches. I leave the rest to my imagination and don’t really attempt to connect the dots.

Leo does look much like the Lion depicted inthe 1603 Bayer catalog.  Click image for larger version.

The stars of Leo do indeed trace out some key parts of the Lion depicted in this plate from the 1603 Bayer atlas. (Click image for larger view.) Note that the bright star that marks the tail is named “Denobola,” which in Arabic really does mean “tail.” We encounter this also in the tail of Cygnus the Swan where the bright star is named “Deneb.” The Arabic star names are frequently descriptive. (Image courtesy of Linda Hall library of Science, Engineering and Technology.)

Regulus, our new bright guidepost star for this month, means “little king,” or “prince,” in Latin. That fits right in with the lion‘s reputation as King of the Beasts. And what a lovely image to have a prince leading a lion onto the night-time stage this month!

Is Regulus memorable in its own right? Well yes. It’s a star that is spinning so fast that if we could see its disc, it would look like a beach ball that someone sat on. It takes Regulus about 16 hours to make one rotation – in comparison, our Sun, a smaller star, takes about a month to rotate. In fact, if Regulus were spinning just a bit faster, it would spin itself apart!

The rapid spinning gives Regulus an equatorial diameter that is about one-third bigger than its polar diameter. This also results in the polar regions of Regulus being much hotter than its equator.

Regulus is also a multiple star system, but as such rather dull visually. The second star in the system is much fainter, so it can barely be detected by a skilled observer using binoculars – and in a telescope it’s so far away from the primary star that the two stars don’t seem like a pair at all. Both these stars are spectroscopic doubles – meaning the companions are so close we can’t see them with a telescope.

Though a relatively young star – about 250 million years as compared to the five-billion-year age of our Sun – Regulus is apparently nearing the end of its normal life as a “main sequence” star. That is, it’s about to finish burning hydrogen, which means it will soon go into the last stages of its life. But according to Jim Kaler, Regulus is also a curious case. It appears to have a very close white dwarf companion which scientists believe once was much larger and brighter than Regulus. But the gases were drawn from the white dwarf into Regulus, making Regulus both huge and bright and causing it to spin the way it does.

In total, Regulus is another example of how what looks like a common star to us, is quite fascinating when seen in the light of modern science.

Vital stats for Regulus:

• Brilliance: Magnitude 1.35, 22nd among the brightest stars in our sky; shines with the luminosity of about 150 Suns.
• Distance: 77 light years
• Spectral Type: B7V
• Position: 10h:08m:22s, +11°:58′:02

The buzz about the Beehive (M44) and Leo’s whiskers – a binocular treat!

In ancient times the constellation Leo extended much farther east and west, and M44 was considered to be its whiskers.

from “The Next Step – Finding and Viewing Messier Object” by Ken Graun

Whiskers indeed! I like that. It’s a great way to remember where to look for M44, for if you can find the Sickle – the huge head and mane of Leo – then all you have to think is “now where would his whiskers be?” Scan 2-3 binocular fields in that direction – westward – and you should soon stumble upon M44, the Beehive. Here is a chart you can use to find it. Do wait  until about two hours after sunset when it is really dark and M44 is well up in the sky.

Click image for larger view. Prepared from Starry Nights Pro screen shot.

Click here to download a black-on-white (printer-friendly) version of this chart.

M44 also is known as “the Beehive,” and Praesepe, which is Latin for manger. And if you have dark skies, away from light pollution, you will see this as a small, wispy cloud, perhaps suggestive of Leo’s whiskers. It is, in fact, a beautiful star cluster as binoculars or a small telescope will reveal. Galileo first discovered its true nature, and in this hazy patch counted more than 40 stars. You should see about that many with your binoculars. This is one of the nearest star clusters to us, and although there is still debate over its exact distance, it is around 580 light years. That compares with about 400 light years for the Pleiades. The two clusters are pretty close to the same size, but M44 is considered much older. M45 – the Pleiades – is estimated to be 78 million years old, while M44 is thought to be about 660 million years old. As star ages go, they’re both quite young. But open clusters, such as these, do not last too long – the members stars tend to get drawn off by close encounters with other stars as the whole clusters moves about our Milky Way galaxy.

The Latin name, Praesepe, is worth examining because it explains the names of two relatively bright stars which flank it – Asellus Borealis and Asellus Australis. Borealis means “northern” and Australis means “southern.” Asellus means “ass” – as in donkey – and Praesepe means “crib” or “manger.” In other words, the Beehive apparently looked to some like a pile of hay in a manger, and these two flanking stars were donkeys eating that hay, one to the north and one to the south. In binoculars the scene should look something like this.

M44 and surroundings as it would appear in binoculars with a 5-degree field of view. Click image for larger view. (Chart derived from Starry Nights software screen shot.)

Click here to download a printer-friendly version of this chart.

The two donkeys are about as bright as the stars in the handle of the Little Dipper, so under dark skies should be faintly visible to the naked eye with the northern one the dimmest. The third star, Eta Cancri, is dimmer still. Its name, however, indicates that it, the Beehive, and other stars shown here are all part of the rather obscure constellation known as Cancer, the crab.

Venus gives the Little King a morning kiss!

Looks eats in the morning sky of October 3, 2012. Click image for larger version – prepared from Starry Nights Pro screen shot.

Exactly how this event looks to you really depends on where you are. From my observation point on the Eastern Seaboard, I’ll catch Venus and Regulus very close to their closest approach with a separation of about 8 minutes of arc shortly after 4 am on October 3, 2012.  By the time the pair rises for West Coast viewers. the separation will be closer to 12 minutes. And, of course, those in “Down East” Maine will have a slightly better view of the event than I do.

But for all of North America and for some other places as well, it will be fun – weather permitting – to see Venus at magnitude -4.1 come so close to a first magnitude star, Regulus, at magnitude 1.34. That means Venus will be about 100 times as bright as Regulus, and I’m pretty sure this will make it impossible to see the star with your naked eye, though it should make a real cool view for binoculars and small telescope users. Regulus (Latin for “little king” or “prince.”) gets these close calls because it is so close to the ecliptic – the green line in our chart – which is the general area of the sky where the planets are found. On July 8, 1959, Regulus was occulted by Venus – that is, completely covered.  That will happen again on October 1, 2044. Of course the two aren’t really close. Venus is in our solar system and at this time about eight light minutes from us, whereas Regulus is 78 light years away.

How does this compare with the view of what is probably the best known double star, Mizar and Alcor in the handle of the Big Dipper?  Many people can split this pair with their naked eye, but they are  11.6 minutes apart.  So just considering the separation in minutes of arc, Venus and Regulus should be very, very difficult to split with  the naked eye. But Mizar and Alcor are  less than two magnitudes apart – a difference of about 6 times in brightness – and that makes it much easier to split them.

Still – I plan to watch starting about 4 am EDT when the pair are high enough above the horizon to see easily. As sunrise nears, the gap will widen to 10 or 11 minutes and separating them may get a bit easier as the glare of Venus will be diminished against the pre-dawn glow. If nothing else, this will certainly drive home the message of how quickly Venus is moving. By the next morning they are separated by more than a degree – still nice to see – and by October 8th or 9th you’ll be hard pressed to fit them both in the same binocular field of view!

Look East in April 2012 – take a simple slide to the World’s Fair Star and continue on to Saturn!

In 1933 it was believed Arcturus was 40 light years from us, so it was appropriare to use it's light, which would have begun it's journey when the 1893 World's Fair was in progress, to turn ont he lights for the 1933 Fair. The 40-inch telescope as Yerkes Observatory captured the energy from Arcturus to do this. Click image for larger view.

Arcturus isn’t universally known as the “World’s Fair Star,”  but  it should be.  Its light bridged two World’s Fairs, making a physical link between the one in 1893  and a second in 1933 – both held in Chicago.  It’s intriguing that  the general public was excited enough about science – in the middle of the Great Depression – to make such a link attractive to the Fair’s promoters. Light from Arcturus  – believed at that time to be 40 light years away – was captured by the 40-inch refractor at Yerkes Observatory and used to turn on the lights for the 1933 Fair.

This put the public spotlight not only on Arcturus, but it raised consciousness about the vast distance between us and that star, since the light being used had started its journey during the 1893 Fair and arrived just in time to start the next Fair. When you know light can circle the Earth more than seven times in a single second, you start to understand just what an incredible journey that was.

Of course Arcturus has many other distinctions. For one thing, it makes a perfect connection with the best known asterism in the sky, the Big Dipper.  To find it, all you have to remember is “follow the arc to Arcturus.”  What’s real cool this April is you can slide on down from the Dipper’s handle to Arcturus, then keep sliding along the same curve and you will hit another bright “star,” Saturn. At the beginning of the month you’ll have to wait until about two hour after sunset for this to be easy, but by mid month it should be obvious an hour or so after sunset assuming you have an unobstructed eastern horizon.  Saturn will be about one fist  – 10 degrees – above the horizon then.  And by the end of the month it will be higher still.

The name"Arcturus" derives from Ancient Greek and means "Guardian of the Bear." It is the brightest star in the constellation Boötes. Click image for a much larger version. (Prepared from Starry Nights Pro screen shot.)

Another way to remember where to find Arcturus is its name, derived from ancient Greek, which can be translated as “Bear Watcher.”  That’s because Arcturus looks like it’s keeping an eye on the “Great Bear,” Ursa Major, as both circle the northern pole.

You can also think of the magnitude system by which we rate the brightness of stars as starting near Arcturus. At magnitude -.04 it’s very close to zero.  Its absolute magnitude is also pretty close to zero since absolute magnitude is defined as how bright a star would be if it were about 33 light years from us, and Arcturus is actually about 37.6 light years from us.  That makes its absolute magnitude -.29.

Arcturus has the distinction of being the brightest star in the northern celestial hemisphere, but this is splitting hairs in several ways. It means it’s the brightest star north of the celestial equator. Sirius, now over in the southwest, is obviously  brighter. But Sirius is south of the celestial equator. Both stars are located close enough to the celestial equator so they can be seen from most places on Earth.

But Arcturus (-.04) also wins this “brightest star in the northern hemisphere” distinction by another hair. Remember that the lower the magnitude number, the brighter the star. Both Vega (.03) and Capella (.08) are north of the celestial equator, and the difference in brightness between Arcturus (-.04), Vega (.03), and Capella (.08) is only a tad more than a tenth of a magnitude.  For practical purposes, they all look the same.  But in practical terms, making the comparison by naked eye is – well –  very impractical. Capella is currently fairly high in the northwest. But next month, when Vega is high enough in the east to see well,  Capella will be rather low in the northwest. At that time Arcturus should look brighter – but its actual brightness will be aided by the fact that it is high over head at that time, so you are seeing it while looking through a lot less air than you will be when looking at Vega or Capella. Besides, visually trying to compare stars that are this far apart is next to impossible. I simply think of all three as magnitude zero and leave the hair splitting to the scientists and their instruments.

Oops – we interrupt this program for a bulletin from 1907!

Yes, having just written how impractical the naked eye comparison is, I found this passage in “The Friendly Stars” by Martha Evans Martin, a book that was published more than a century ago:

Arcturus and Capella are so nearly equal in brightness that astronomers differ as to which outranks the other, even when they measure  their light with a supposedly accurate  instrument and a trained eye. To my own eye Arcturus outshines Capella, and on asking various inexperienced persons for off-hand opinions as to the relative brightness of the two stars, I have invariably had an answer in favor of Arcturus. The best authorities, however, make Capella a shade brighter.

Oh my! And now with 100 years of scientific progress, the verdict is that Martha Evans Martin and her causal observer friends were correct – and the “best authorities”  wrong. Arcturus is the brightest.  So much for my idea that you can’t tell the difference with the naked eye! Give it a try and see what you think. (You can find a chart for Capella and more details about that star  in this post.) Since we’re ranking stars, however, Arcturus is actually fourth on the list of brightest stars – two others that are ahead of it, Canopus and Rigel Kentaurus, are not seen by observers in mid-northern latitudes.

While Arcturus radiates a lot of energy, much of it is not in the form of visible light. It has what’s known as a “peculiar spectrum” and radiates much of its energy in the infrared portion of the spectrum.  This means that to our eyes it doesn’t look as bright as it really is.

Orange-ish Arcturus is 215 times as bright as our Sun and 25 times the Sun’s diameter. (Image courtesy of  Windows of the Universe.)

One more deception of sorts: This brightness is not because Arcturus is so big – well , yes it is, but not big in terms of the amount of stuff in it, but big in terms of surface area. If you’re measuring the amount of stuff that makes up Arcturus – its mass – it is about the same size as our Sun. But Arcturus has a much greater surface area, so think of it as a hugely bloated version of our Sun. (Keep that in mind when you look at the comparison sketch above.) It is a much older star and is now going through its red giant phase, something our Sun will probably do several billion years from now, burning the Earth to a cinder in the process.

Vital stats for Arcturus, also  known as Alpha Bootes:

•    Brilliance: Magnitude  -.04, brightest star in the celestial northern hemisphere; shines with the luminosity of 215 Suns.

•    Distance: 37 light years

•    Spectral Type: K1 Giant

•    Position: 14h:15m:38s, +19°:10′:5

Guideposts reminder

Each month you’re encouraged to learn the new “guidepost” stars and asterisms rising in the east about an hour after sunset. One reason for doing this is so you can then see how they move in the following months. So if you have been following – even if this is just your second month – look for the previous guidepost stars and asterisms that you have learned and that are still with us in April. Here’s the list from east to west.

Arcturus, Leo’s Rump  (triangle), The Sickle, Regulus, the Beehive, Mars, Procyon, Sirius, Pollux, Castor, Betelegeuse, Orion’s Belt, Rigel, Capella, the Kite, Aldebaran, the Winter Hexagon, the Pleiades.

The “March” of the Planets – they’re just Wild in the West in March 2012 – what you’ll see and why!

March starts off with a double-barreled planetary bang as Venus and Jupiter  meet and dance briefly, while just below them Mercury puts in its best appearance of the year zipping up for an easy look, then zipping back down.

First we’ll describe what you can see in a few simple charts, then we’ll delve into why you see it on the premise that the actual sight is much more exciting if you know what’s really going on back stage!  ( We also have a neat appearance by Mars in the eastern sky and Saturn in the morning sky, but more on that later. Oh – and while Mercury favors northern hemisphere observers this month, those in the south do see a good Jupiter/Venus show.)

What you’ ll see – March 1 -15

Go out a few minutes before sunset to a point where you have an unobstructed western horizon. Bring binoculars if you like – even a small telescope, though the naked eye gives a terrific view of this show. First, enjoy the sunset – get a sense of the Earth turning beneath your feet, and where the Sun is as it sets – though don’t look directly at it and certainly do NOT point telescope or binoculars there.  Wait 15-30 minutes and here’s what you should see in the twilight.

March gets going with a bang with this great planetary lineup in the western sky - the highlight of which is fleeting and elusive Mercury. Like all the star charts in this post, this was prepared from Starry Nights Pro screenshot. Click any star chart image for a larger view.

Yes, that’s my fist in the foreground. But you can use yours to help you find Mercury, the faintest of these three bright planets. Mercury will be about 10 degrees above the horizon, half an hour after sunset.  Hold your fist at arm’s length and you will cover about 10 degrees. (Yes, smaller people – or larger – have different size fists, but the proportions of arm length to fist size stay the same so this generally works.)  If you see this planetary line up, here are some things to notice.

First, look at the relative brightness of the three planets:

  • Venus is the brightest of the three by far. It glows at magnitude -4.3. Only the Moon and Sun are brighter.
  • Jupiter is next in brightness at -2.2 – brighter than any star gets.
  • Mercury is near its brightest at -.9 – but that makes it dimmer than the brightest star, now high in the south, Sirius – it’s about half a magnitude brighter.  And the fact that Mercury is so low and in bright twilight will make it more difficult to see. Binoculars will help find it, but it should be quite easily seen with the naked eye, especially when you know where to look.

Second. use your fist held at arms length (see chart) to note how high Mercury is above the horizon. This will change rapidly over the next 10 days.

Third, use your fist to estimate the distance between Jupiter and Venus. (One fist is 10 degrees.) This too will change rapidly over the next two weeks as Jupiter “falls” towards Venus and Venus  appears to quickly climb towards Jupiter.

Here are some charts at five day intervals to show the changes you can expect to see.

March 5, 2012

March 10, 2012

March 15, 2012

 So why do the planets appear where and when they do and why does Mercury change so rapidly in both position and brightness. Hop in your spaceship and zoom to a point well over the Sun so you can look down on our Solar System and watch the planets revolve.  That will give you the answer.

The two planets closer to the Sun than us – Venus and Mercury – revolve the fastest and have the shortest orbits.  They also pass between us and the Sun and thus go through phases like our Moon because we only see part of the sunlit portion of the planet as this happens. The outer planets, including Mars, Jupiter , and Saturn (all visible in our skies in March) don’t go through such phases and they change position more slowly – especially Jupiter and Saturn.

So let’s start with an overview showing where we and the other planets are on March 1, 2012. (All of these views are taken from the Orrery at  “Solar System Live” – a web site I heartily recommend you visit often and play with by changing the dates, etc., as encouraged at that site.)

March 1, 2012 – the entire Solar System

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In this first view you need to imagine yourself on Earth. The Sun has just set, but you can see that when you look in the general direction of the Sun (west) you will see Mercury very close to it, Venus a bit farther away, and Jupiter farther away still.  If you turn around and look East you will see Mars near the Eastern horizon. Saturn is to the east as well, but will not be seen until near midnight and is really a morning sky object.

If you could look at the three bright planets in the Western sky with a small telescope, they would look something like the following picture.

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To see the phases of Venus and Mercury in a small telescope it is best to catch them in twilight – start about 10 minutes after sunset -again, be careful not to look at the Sun with your telescope as your eyes would be severely damaged. Wait until the Sun is well below the horizon.  Venus gets so bright once it is fully dark that it tends to dazzle and dance and it is more difficult to see the phases then.  Mercury, on the other hand, is seldom high enough to get a good look because you are looking through so much atmosphere – but this is the best chance to see it in 2012. The relative sizes you see here are roughly the way they would appear in a telescope – they don’t represent the actual size difference of the planets because Jupiter – the largest by far – is much farther from us than either Venus or Mercury and so appears smaller than it really is.

March 5, 2012 – dance of the inner planets

In the following sequence you will see the Orrery view of Earth and the inner planets, as well as a view of what we see in the sky on each date  and how the phases of Mercury are changing. These changes in phase should make clear why the planet appears dimmer with each day after  March 5. On March 15 it will be quite difficult to see, as it will not only be close to the horizon, but it will have fallen in brightness almost two full magnitudes – that’s roughly the same difference in brightness you see between Jupiter and Venus – quite a change!

Western sky planets March 5, 2012 with inset showing how Mercury would appear in a small telescope.

Notice how Mercury is getting between us and the Sun - soon it will be lost in the Sun's glare.

Mercury is now (March 15) quite low, quite faint, and very difficult to see - and no wonder - just a slither of its sunlit face is visible to us as it comes near to passing between us and the Sun.

Mars and Saturn

Mars is an easy shot, visible in the east right after sunset, though it will be easier to see if you wait an hour or two. Use the chart in the “Look East” post here.  Mars gets close to us every two years, but not all “close” approaches are the same. Mars has an eliptical orbit and sometimes we hit it – as we are in 2012 – when it is closest to us, yet about as far as it gets from the Sun. That means it’s around 65 million miles form us this month. In some years it can be almosy half that distance from us, so while amateur astronomers will train their telescopes on it this month, it will appear relatively small.

Saturn is a wonderful sight in a small telescope and you can easily find it in the morning sky with the naked eye. Here’s a chart for a couple hours before sunrise at mid-month. Note that it is pretty close to one of our bright, guidepost stars, Spica, and they are roughly equal in brightness.

The early morning sky to the southwest is rich in bright stars and planets. Prepared from screenshot of Starry Nights Pro software. Click image for larger version.

For a printer friendly version of this chart, click here.

If you studied the “Look East” post this month you met  Regulus, Mars, the Sickle and Triangle of Leo in the early evening sky. Now as Sunrise approaches they are nearing the Western horizon.  Saturn and Spica make a nice pair in the southwest that are hard to miss, with bright Arcturus above them and the brilliant, reddish guidepost star, Antares about due south.

Look East: March 2012 – with Mars – Roars in like a sickle and triangle! (Huh?)

Sure, I’d like to tell you March roars in like a lion – but honestly it’s easier to point to the sickle and the triangle and the “Little King” we call Regulus, this last being the new guidepost star for March. But there is a lion there, too. Let’s look at the sickle and triangle first, though, because they’re two very easy asterisms you’ll see in the east about an hour or so after sunset. The Big Dipper off to the northeast gives you an idea of size for comparison.

This is the eastern sky as it will appear about an hour after sunset from mid-northern latitudes. The circle represents a typical field of view for low power binoculars. While you should see the brightest stars easily, in twilight - or in typical light pollution - you'll find that binoculars will show some of the fainter stars nearby and help you be sure you have identified the correct bright star. The Mars position is for the 15th, but it will change a little each night. Click image for larger view. Prepared from Starry Nights Pro screen shot.

Click here to download a black-on-white (printer-friendly) version of this chart.

OK – so can you make this into a lion? I find it fairly easy if I consider the sickle his head and mane – and I consider the triangle his rear haunches. I leave the rest to my imagination and don’t really attempt to connect the dots.

Leo does look much like the Lion depicted inthe 1603 Bayer catalog.  Click image for larger version.
The stars of Leo do indeed trace out some key parts of the Lion depicted in this plate from the 1603 Bayer atlas. (Click image for larger view.) Note that the bright star that marks the tail is named “Denobola,” which in Arabic really does mean “tail.” We encounter this also in the tail of Cygnus the Swan where the bright star is named “Deneb.” The Arabic star names are frequently descriptive. (Image courtesy of Linda Hall library of Science, Engineering and Technology.)

 

Regulus, our new bright guidepost star for this month, means “little king,” or “prince,” in Latin. That fits right in with the lion‘s reputation as King of the Beasts. And what a lovely image to have a prince leading a lion onto the night-time stage this month!

Is Regulus memorable in its own right? Well yes. It’s a star that is spinning so fast that if we could see its disc, it would look like a beach ball that someone sat on. It takes Regulus about 16 hours to make one rotation – in comparison, our Sun, a smaller star, takes about a month to rotate. In fact, if Regulus were spinning just a bit faster, it would spin itself apart!

The rapid spinning gives Regulus an equatorial diameter that is about one-third bigger than its polar diameter. This also results in the polar regions of Regulus being much hotter than its equator.

Regulus is also a multiple star system, but as such rather dull visually. The second star in the system is much fainter, so it can barely be detected by a skilled observer using binoculars – and in a telescope it’s so far away from the primary star that the two stars don’t seem like a pair at all. Both these stars are spectroscopic doubles – meaning the companions are so close we can’t see them with a telescope.

Though a relatively young star – about 250 million years as compared to the five-billion-year age of our Sun – Regulus is apparently nearing the end of its normal life as a “main sequence” star. That is, it’s about to finish burning hydrogen, which means it will soon go into the last stages of its life. But according to Jim Kaler, Regulus is also a curious case. It appears to have a very close white dwarf companion which scientists believe once was much larger and brighter than Regulus. But the gases were drawn from the white dwarf into Regulus, making Regulus both huge and bright and causing it to spin the way it does.

In total, Regulus is another example of how what looks like a common star to us, is quite fascinating when seen in the light of modern science.

Vital stats for Regulus:

• Brilliance: Magnitude 1.35, 22nd among the brightest stars in our sky; shines with the luminosity of about 150 Suns.
• Distance: 77 light years
• Spectral Type: B7V
• Position: 10h:08m:22s, +11°:58′:02

The buzz about the Beehive (M44) and Leo’s whiskers – a binocular treat!

In ancient times the constellation Leo extended much farther east and west, and M44 was considered to be its whiskers.

from “The Next Step – Finding and Viewing Messier Object” by Ken Graun

Whiskers indeed! I like that. It’s a great way to remember where to look for M44, for if you can find the Sickle – the huge head and mane of Leo – then all you have to think is “now where would his whiskers be?” Scan 2-3 binocular fields in that direction – westward – and you should soon stumble upon M44, the Beehive. Here is a chart you can use to find it. Do wait  until about two hours after sunset when it is really dark and M44 is well up in the sky.

Click image for larger view. Prepared from Starry Nights Pro screen shot.

Click here to download a black-on-white (printer-friendly) version of this chart.

M44 also is known as “the Beehive,” and Praesepe, which is Latin for manger. And if you have dark skies, away from light pollution, you will see this as a small, wispy cloud, perhaps suggestive of Leo’s whiskers. It is, in fact, a beautiful star cluster as binoculars or a small telescope will reveal. Galileo first discovered its true nature, and in this hazy patch counted more than 40 stars. You should see about that many with your binoculars. This is one of the nearest star clusters to us, and although there is still debate over its exact distance, it is around 580 light years. That compares with about 400 light years for the Pleiades. The two clusters are pretty close to the same size, but M44 is considered much older. M45 – the Pleiades – is estimated to be 78 million years old, while M44 is thought to be about 660 million years old. As star ages go, they’re both quite young. But open clusters, such as these, do not last too long – the members stars tend to get drawn off by close encounters with other stars as the whole clusters moves about our Milky Way galaxy.

The Latin name, Praesepe, is worth examining because it explains the names of two relatively bright stars which flank it – Asellus Borealis and Asellus Australis. Borealis means “northern” and Australis means “southern.” Asellus means “ass” – as in donkey – and Praesepe means “crib” or “manger.” In other words, the Beehive apparently looked to some like a pile of hay in a manger, and these two flanking stars were donkeys eating that hay, one to the north and one to the south. In binoculars the scene should look something like this.

M44 and surroundings as it would appear in binoculars with a 5-degree field of view. Click image for larger view. (Chart derived from Starry Nights software screen shot.)

Click here to download a printer-friendly version of this chart.

The two donkeys are about as bright as the stars in the handle of the Little Dipper, so under dark skies should be faintly visible to the naked eye with the northern one the dimmest. The third star, Eta Cancri, is dimmer still. Its name, however, indicates that it, the Beehive, and other stars shown here are all part of the rather obscure constellation known as Cancer, the crab.

Look East! March 2010 roars in like a Lion – with Saturn tagging behind!

March roars into our eastern night sky like a lion – Leo, the Lion that is, led by the Little King “Regulus” and in 2010 brings Saturn with it. Just ahead of it is a special binocular treat, M44, a veritable beehive of stars barely visible to the unaided eye. Think of it as the lion’s whiskers. And don’t forget to look for the zodiacal light!

Leo does look much like the Lion depicted inthe 1603 Bayer catalog.  Click image for larger version.

The stars of Leo do indeed trace out some key parts of the Lion depicted in this plate from the 1603 Bayer atlas. (Click image for larger view.) Note that the bright star that marks the tail is named "Denobola," which in Arabic really does mean "tail." We encounter this also in the tail of Cygnus the Swan where the bright star is named "Deneb." The Arabic star names are frequently descriptive. (Image courtesy of Linda Hall library of Science, Engineering and Technology.)

 

I don’t usually put an emphasis on constellations, but in March it is fitting, for it makes it easy to remember what it is you see in the East just after sunset and besides, this is one of those constellations where when you connect the dots it looks something like it is supposed to look.

In fact, in my mind’s eye I can see the classic lion of the old Bayer star charts, but I more often see two very easy to remember asterisms – the Sickle that forms Leo’s head and mane, and the Triangle that forms Leo’s rump. And Regulus, our new bright guidepost star for this month, means “little king,” or “prince,” in Latin. That fits right in with the lion‘s reputation as King of the Beasts. And what a lovely image to have a prince leading a lion onto the night-time stage this month! Here’s our eastern sky chart. (As usual, click the image for a larger version, or download a printable version.)

Click image for larger view. Use link below to download a printer-friendly version. (Chart developed from Starry Nights screen shot.)

Click here to download a black-on-white (printer-friendly) version of this chart.

If you look in the same spot an hour or so later – or wait until mid-month, you will get the special treat of seeing Saturn, a favorite target for small telescopes, though this month it will be a tad disappointing to telescope users. Right now Saturn’s rings appear tilted as seen from Earth so that they make a thin line extending out from either side of the planet. In most years, they are at such an angle that they make a much better display. But Saturn is a special feature for this year, 2010. It won’t be back with the stars of Leo for another decade. So lets get on to the prime star in the east that’s there every year at this time, Regulus.

Is Regulus memorable in its own right? Well yes. It’s a star that is spinning so fast that if we could see its disc, it would look like a beach ball that someone sat on. It takes Regulus about 16 hours to make one rotation – in comparison our Sun, a smaller star, takes about a month to rotate. In fact, if Regulus were spinning just a bit faster, it would spin itself apart!

The rapid spinning gives Regulus an equatorial diameter that is about one-third bigger than its polar diameter. This also results in the polar regions of Regulus being much hotter than its equator.

Regulus is also a multiple star system, but as such rather dull visually. The second star in the system is much fainter, so it can barely be detected by a skilled observer using binoculars – and in a telescope it’s so far away from the primary star that they don’t seem like a pair at all. Both the primary and secondary are spectroscopic doubles – meaning the companions are so close we can’t see them with a telescope.

Though a relatively young star – about 250 million years as compared to the five billion year age of our Sun – Regulus is apparently nearing the end of its normal life as a “main sequence” star. That is, it’s about to finish burning hydrogen, which means it will soon go into the last stages of its life. But according to Jim Kaler, Regulus is also a curious case. It appears to have a very close white dwarf companion which scientists believe once was much larger and brighter than Regulus. But the gases were drawn from the white dwarf into Regulus making it both huge and bright and causing it to spin the way it does.

In total, Regulus is another example of how what looks like a common star to us, is quite fascinating when seen in the light of modern science.

Vital stats for Regulus:

• Brilliance: Magnitude 1.35, 22nd among the brightest stars in our sky; shines with the luminosity of about 150 Suns.
• Distance: 77 light years
• Spectral Type: B7V
• Position: 10h:08m:22s, +11°:58′:02

The buzz about the Beehive (M44), Mars, and Leo’s whiskers

In ancient times the constellation Leo extended much farther east and west, and M44 was considered to be its whiskers.

from “The Next Step – Finding and Viewing Messier Object” by Ken Graun

Whiskers indeed! I like that. It’s a great way to remember where to look for M44, for if you can find the Sickle – the huge head and main of Leo – then all you have to think is “now where would his whiskers be?” Scan 2-3 binocular fields in that direction – westward – and you should soon stumble upon M44, the Beehive. In 2010 this is especially easy. Start at Regulus and scan towards Mars, one of the brightest objects in the sky. M44 will be along this path, much nearer to Mars than to Regulus. Here is a chart you can use to find it – and to map the changing position of Mars, which will be especially interesting in March.

Following Mars and finding M44, the Beehive - or if you like, Leo's whiskers! Click chart to see larger image. (Chart developed from Starry Nights screen shot.)

Click here to download a black-on-white (printer-friendly) version of this chart that you can also use to chart the movements of Mars.

Over the next couple of months Mars will serve as a bright beacon making it easier to locate M44 whose other names are “the Beehive,” and Praesepe, which is Latin for manger. And if you have dark skies, away from light pollution, you will see this as a small, wispy cloud, perhaps suggestive of Leo’s whiskers. It is, in fact, a beautiful star cluster as binoculars or a small telescope will reveal. Galileo first discovered its true nature and in this hazy patch discovered more than 40 stars. You should see about that many with your binoculars. This is one of the nearest star clusters to us, and although there is still debate over its exact distance, it is around 580 light years. That compares with about 400 light years for the Pleiades. The two clusters are pretty close to the same size, but M44 is considered much older. M45 – the Pleiades – is estimated to be 78 million years old, while M44 is thought to be about 660 million years old. As star ages go, they’re both quite young.

The Latin name, Praesepe, is worth examining because it explains the names of two relatively bright stars which flank it – Asellus Borealis and Asellus Australis. Borealis means “northern” and Australis means “southern.” Asellus means “ass” – as in donkey – and Praesepe means “crib” or “manger.” In other words, the Beehive apparently looked to some like a pile of hay in a manger and these two flanking stars were donkeys, eating that hay, one to the north and one to the south. In binoculars the scene should look something like this screen shot from Starry Nights software to which I’ve added labels.

M44 and surroundings as it would appear in binoculars with a 5-degree field of view. Click image for larger view. (Chart derived from Starry Nights software screen shot.)

Click here to download a printer-friendly version of this chart.

The two donkeys are about as bright as the stars in the handle of the Little Dipper, so under dark skies should be faintly visible to the naked eye with the northern one the dimmest. The third star, Eta Cancri, is dimmer still. Its name, however, indicates that it, the Beehive, and other stars shown here are all part of the rather obscure constellation known as Cancer, the crab.

There’s a revealing naked eye exercise buried here as well. This is a good month to chart the course of Mars across the background of stars. Mars starts out the month appearing to run away from the Beehive – that is, it’s moving westward against the background of stars. Then, just before mid-month it appears to stand still for a couple of days as it reverses direction and starts to come back towards the Beehive (eastward) as if tugged by an invisible cord. In April it will skip right by, missing the Beehive by less than a degree and passing between the Northern Ass and the Southern Ass.

Keep in mind that all this happens over a period of days and weeks, and to see it you need to carefully chart the position of Mars against the background of stars on several nights. This sort of exercise helps you appreciate great observers who charted the heavens before the invention of the telescope. It also helps you understand how puzzled early observers were by the apparent behavior of Mars and why this had them scratching their heads for centuries trying to make sense of these movements in a universe where Earth was at the center of everything. During any given night, of course, everything appears to move westward because of the rotation of the Earth. The movement we’re interested in here is the revolution of Earth and Mars around the Sun.

It’s much easier today – with a sun-centered solar system – to understand why Mars first appears to move in one direction, then the other. This is caused simply by Earth overtaking Mars as the two planets orbit the Sun at different distances and speeds. Here’s where the planets are in mid-March, courtesy of John Walker’s “Solar System Live” online orrery.

Click image for larger view.

See the Zodiacal Light

Finally, don’t forget to look for the zodiacal light this month – especially if you missed it last month.

You don’t need a totally clear horizon to see the zodiacal light, or binoculars, but you do need total darkness and that means little-to-no light pollution. I feel I have a good shot at it from my favorite ocean-front observing point where I have a clear horizon to the west with no cities to create light domes there. Moonless evenings in February, March, and April – and mornings in September and October – are the best time for folks at mid-northern latitudes to look for this subtle phenomena. In March 2010 that means to look about 80 minutes after sunset on a clear night between March 1 and March 15.

For more detailed information on this, see the February posting here.

Follow the arc to Arcturus!

Prime time in April finds the familiar Big Dipper high in the northeastern sky and its gracefully curved handle provides a gentle arc that points us right to our April guidepost star – Arcturus.

If you continue that arc it will lead you to the May guidepost star, Spica – but don’t worry if you don’t see Spica this month – it is low in the southeast, but it will get higher.  Meanwhile, Saturn is as bright as any of our guidepost stars, about halfway up the sky in the southeast about 45 minutes after sunset. About another 15 degrees above and to the right is Regulus, the dominant star in Leo.

Click image to see a  larger version.

Click image to see a larger version.

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