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    My Journey through the Astronomical Year

    Think of this as a "companion text" to this, the main web site. Not required reading, butI hope you'll find it interesting and helpful.

Events, June 2014 – Bright Lights Along the Ecliptic this Month

This is a great month to become familiar with the ecliptic in our sky. The ecliptic is the plane of our solar system where you will always find the Sun, Moon, and Planets.

Finding it sounds simple – and it is if you pick your time and date. The problem is it changes constantly because the Earth is tilted on its axis and revolving around the Sun.  I should stress one more thing – the ecliptic is not the path you will see the Sun, Moon, and planets take across the sky in a given night – it is the path they will follow as they change position over days, weeks, and even years. How quickly an object follows this path depends on how close it is to us – the Moon makes it completely around the ecliptic each month, the Sun each year – but a distant planet, such as Saturn, takes about 30 years.

You can trace the portion of this path visible about an hour after sunset on a June night in 2014. For the chart below I chose June 13th simply to include a nearly full Moon in the picture. It will, of course, change position each night – but the planets will stick pretty close to these general spots all month. So go out an hour or so after sunset and start your search by looking to the northwest for brilliant Jupiter. It will be brighter than any star, or any of the other planets and only about 10 degrees above the horizon – ten degrees can be measured by holding your closed fist at arms length.

Jupiter thus achors the western end of the ecliptic. We’ll move eastward to trace out the rest of it.

Click on this chart to get a much larger version. (Prepared from Starry Nights Pro screen shot.)

Click on this chart to get a much larger version. (Prepared from Starry Nights Pro screen shot.)

 

Up above Jupiter are the famous Gemini Twins – the nearer and slightly brighter one is Pollux, the other is Castor.

Turn a bit south of west you will find the bright star Regulus. While it outshines most other stars visible tonight, it is just in between Castor and Pollux in brightness and is about 30 degrees above the horizon – three fists.

Next on our list is the red planet Mars – the second brightest object on our chart. If you’re not detecting the rusty redness of it, try looking at it in binoculars. Then compare it with the next bright star on our chart, Spica. Spica is a  little lower than Mars an quite a bit dimmer. (Mats is four fist high, Spica about three and half.) Spica, however, is a very hot – and thus very blue – star. Look at the difference in color between it and Mars.

Moving eastward you’ll find Saturn, whose beautiful rings will show in even a small telescope. However, to the naked eye and binoculars Saturn simply looks like a bright star – not as bright as Mars, but certainly brighter than Spica. It has a pale, yellowish hue.

Continuing to the east is Antares, just 15-degrees – a fist and a half – above the horizon.  It’s name means “rival to Mars” and for good reason – it is a classic, red star, rivaling the color of Mars.  Again, contrast its color with that of Spica and Mars.

Oh – high overhead is the bright star Arcturus. It’s about as bright as Saturn and nearly 70 degrees above the horizon – seven fists.  Do you remember how to find Arcturus? You “follow the arc” of the Big Dipper’s handle – now high in our northern sky, to Arcturus, then “drive a spike” to Spica.

What else is going on this month?

Well, two dates to keep in mind:

The Summer Solstice is June 21 at 6:57 am EDT – and thus begins the longest day of the year.

On June 24 a thin crescent Moon will be very close to the brightest of planets, Venus in the eastern sky about an hour before sunrise. Should be a pretty sight and a nice picture opportunity.

Look East! Drive a Spike to Spica (pronounced Spy-ka) and two planets in May 2014!

If you followed “the arc” of the Big Dipper ‘s handle last month to find Arcturus, then you “drive a spike”  this month to find Spica –  pronounced Spy-ka – plus Mars and Saturn. It’s like taking a long, cool slide from the Dipper – and the “Arc-to-Arcturus” and “Spike-to-Spica” relationships hold true as long as these stars are in our skies – which will be right through August.

Here’s how it looks – remember: look east  starting about an hour after Sunset.  Arcturus, Spica, and Mars should all be visible as the first stars emerge, but Saturn will have to wait a bit. At the start of the month it may be too low until about two hours after sunset – but each night it rises earlier and earlier. On May 10 it is in opposition, rising as the sun sets.

Click to enlarge. (Prepared from Starry Nights Pro screen shot.)

Click to enlarge. (Prepared from Starry Nights Pro screen shot.)

Click here to download a printer-friendly version of this chart.

While the Dipper is easy to recognize, its stars are second magnitude – bright, but easily out-shone by the triangle of Arcturus, Mars, and Saturn. Even Spica, almost exactly magnitude 1, is brighter than the Dipper stars. Still, the Dipper stars will be very high in the northeast and easy to spot as it gets dark.  The brightest star in this section of the sky is Arcturus at magnitude minus 0.04. (Remember, the lower the magnitude number, the brighter the object – minus magnitude are brighter still.) The next brightest star you’ll see is over to your left, low in the northeast – Vega at magnitude 0.04. So Vega is barely on the plus side of  magnitude  zero and Arcturus is barely on the minus side, a difference that is next to impossible to detect with the eye. This year both these stars will be out shone by Mars, almost magnitude -1,  and Saturn is just a tad dimmer than Arcturus and Vega, though about a full magnitude dimmer than Mars.  Together these  five –  Mars, Arcturus, Vega, Saturn, and Spica will give you a good sense of the magnitude scale. In fact, throw in Polaris – the North Star, which is almost exactly magnitude 2 and you have a range of four magnitudes represented – quite a brilliant display.

The color contrast is exceptional here too. As these stars and planets get higher in the sky, you will notice that Mars is definitely reddish, Spica is a rich blue, while Saturn has a yellow tint.

We dealt with Arcturus last month. Saturn will be in our sky all night and as always is a treat for the small telescope user. From a naked eye perspective,  it’s fun to remember that the name “planet” means “wanderer” in Greek, but all “wanderers” are not created equal. Mars, Venus, and Mercury move  so quickly in our night sky that you can easily mark their changes over a period of a few days -certainly a week.  Saturn is much more sluggish.

Saturn changes position over the course of an entire year by roughly 12 degrees.  To see this in the sky , find Saturn. Hold your fist at arms length so Saturn is just below it. Just above your fist is where Saturn was last year. Put Saturn on top of your fist and just below your fist is where it will be next year. So how long will it take Saturn to get around the sky to roughly the same position? Well, 360/12 = about 30 years!  Now if you think a moment, the Moon takes about 30 days to get around our sky – and that means the Moon moves each day about 12  degrees –  the same apparent distance covered by Saturn each year.  All of which should tell you that it would be reasonable to assume Saturn is much farther away from us than the Moon – which, of course, it is.

None of this is rocket science, but I find it interesting to contemplate as I look up and see Saturn. I measure that distance it will travel in the next year and in my mind’s eye I stand above the Solar System and I see a long thin pie slice reaching from me to Saturn’s distance orbit and this helps me keep things in perspective – gives me a better intuitive feel for the neighborhood in which we live.  OK – for the record Saturn is moving at about 22,000 miles an hour, Mars about 54,000 miles an hour in a much shorter orbit, and we’re whipping right along close to 67,000 miles an hour – and we don’t even feel the wind in our face! Oh – and Saturn’s actual orbital period is 29.458 years.

On to this month’s new guidepost stars!

Vega and Spica are each fascinating stars, but let’s start with Vega. Shining brightly not far above the northeastern horizon as the evening begins, Vega comes about as close to defining the word “star” as you can get. In “The Hundred Greatest Stars” James Kaler calls it “the ultimate standard star” because its magnitude is about as close to zero as you can get  and its color is about as close to white as you can get. (If you’re one of those who assumed all stars are white, you’re forgiven. Individuals vary in their ability to see different colors in stars and for everyone the color differences are subtle – in fact I think of them as tints rather than colors. )

It’s hard not to be attracted to Vega when you read Leslie Peltier’s wonderful autobiography, “Starlight Nights.” Vega was central to his astronomical observing throughout his career because he began with it when he first started reading the book from which I got the idea for this web site, “The Friendly Stars” by Martha Evans Martin. Peltier wrote:

According to the descriptive text Vega, at that very hour in the month of May, would be rising in the northeastern sky. I took the open book outside, walked around to the east side of the house, glanced once more at the diagram by the light that came through the east window of the kitchen, looked up towards the northeast and there, just above the plum tree blooming by the well, was Vega. And there she had been all the springtimes of my life, circling around the pole with her five attendant stars, fairly begging for attention, and I had never seen her.

Now I knew a star! It had been incredibly simple, and all the stars to follow were equally easy.

Vega went on to be the first target of the 2-inch telescope he bought with the $18 he made by raising and picking strawberries. (This was around 1915.) And Vega became the first target for every new telescope he owned until his death in 1980. If you still don’t know a star, go out and introduce yourself to Vega early on a May evening. Even without a plum tree to look over, you can’t miss her! And once you’ve done that you’re well on your way to making the night sky your own.  (And yes, Vega is the star from which the message comes in Carl Sagan’s book/movie “Contact.”)

Vital stats for Vega, also known as Alpha Lyrae:

• Brilliance: Magnitude .03 ; a standard among stars; total radiation is that of 54 Suns.
• Distance: 25 light years
• Spectral Type: A0 Dwarf
• Position: 18h:36m:56s, +38°:47′:01″

Spica, a really bright star – honest!

Spica is truly a very bright star, but the numbers you may read for its brightness can have you pulling your hair. That’s because there are at least four common ways to express the brightness of Spica and other stars, and writers don’t always tell you which way they’re using. So let’s look at these four ways and see what they mean for Spica.

The first is the most obvious. How bright does it look to you and me from our vantage point on Earth using our eyes alone? We then assign it a brightness using the magnitude system with the lower the number, the brighter star. (For full discussion of this system, see “How bright is that star?”)

By this measure Spica is 16th on the list of brightest stars and is about as close as you can come to being exactly magnitude 1. (Officially 1.04) Though I should add here that the number really marks the midpoint of a magnitude designation – that is, any star that is in the range of magnitude .5 to magnitude 1.5 is called “magnitude 1” and so on for the other numbers on the scale.

But that scale talks about what we see. It doesn’t account for distance. Obviously if you have two 60-watt light bulbs and one is shining 6 feet away from you and the other 1,000 feet away, they are not going to look the same brightness. But if we put them both at the same distance – say 100 feet – they would look the same. So it is with stars. To compare them we pretend they all were at the same distance – in this case 10 parsecs, which is about 32.6 light years. Put our Sun at that distance and it would be magnitude 4.83. (That’s about as faint as the fainest stars we see in the Little Dipper.) We call that its absolute magnitude.

The absolute magnitude for Spica is -3.55 – not quite as bright as dazzling Venus.

Wow! That’s pretty bright compared to our Sun! Yes it is. Sun 4.83; Spica -3.55. Don’t miss the “minus” sign in front of Spica’s number! That means there’s more than eight magnitudes difference between the Sun and Spica. And that relates to the next figure you are likely to see quoted. Something that is called its luminosity. Luminosity compares the brightness of a star to the brightness of our Sun. Unfortunately, the term is often misused – or poorly defined. Thus in the Wikipedia article I just read on Spica it said that “Spica has a luminosity about 2,300 times that of the Sun.” Yes, but what does that mean? It means that if we were to put the two side by side, Spica would appear to our eyes to be 2,300 times as bright as our Sun.

That is bright! But there’s more, much more. Spica is also a very hot star – in fact one of the brightest hot stars that we see with our naked eyes. But we miss most of that brightness because most of it is being radiated in forms of energy that our eyes don’t detect. In the case of Spica, that is largely ultraviolet energy. The Wikipedia article actually listed Spica’s luminosity twice, and the second time it gave it as “13,400/1,700.”

Oh boy – now we have Spica not 2,300 times as bright as the Sun, but more than 13,000 times as bright. Now that IS bright – but is it right? Yes! So why the difference? Again, the first “luminosity” given – 2,300 times that of the Sun – is measuring only what we can see with our eyes. The second is measuring total amount of electromagnetic radiation a star radiates and is properly called the “bolometric luminosity.” And why two numbers for that last figure? 13,400/1,700? Because while Spica looks like one star to us, it is really two stars that are very close together and one is much brighter than the other. So what we see as one star is really putting out energy in the neighborhood of 15,100 times as much as our Sun.

This can get confusing, so I suggest you remember three things about Spica.

1. It defines first magnitude, having a brightness as it appears to us of 1.04.

2. It is really far brighter (magnitude -3.55), but appears dim because it is far away – about 250 light years by the most recent measurements.

3. It is very hot – appearing blue to our eyes – and because it is very hot it is actually radiating a lot more energy in wavelengths we don’t see, so it is far, far brighter than our Sun.

Spica is the brightest star in the constellation Virgo, one of those constellations where you can not really connect the dots and form a picture of a virgin unless you have an over abundance of imagination. Besides, the remaining stars are relatively faint. That’s why we focus on the bright stars and sometimes those simple patterns known as “asterisms” and use them as our guides.

Vital stats for Spica, also known as Alpha Virgo:

• Brilliance: Magnitude 1.04; a close double whose combined radiation is the equal of 15,100 Suns.
• Distance: 250 light years
• Spectral Types: B1,B4 Dwarfs
• Position: 13h:25m:12s, -11°:09′:41″

Guideposts reminder

Each month you’re encouraged to learn the new “guidepost” stars rising in the east about an hour after sunset. One reason for doing this is so you can then see how they move in the following months. If you have been reading these posts for several months, you may want to relate Spica to two earlier guidepost stars with which it forms a right triangle, Arcturus and Regulus.

Once you have identified the Right Triangle, note carefully the positions of Spica and Regulus. They pretty much mark the “ecliptic.” This is the path followed by the Sun. Also, within a few degrees north or south of it, you will find the planets and the Moon. That’s well illustrated in 2014 by the presence of both Saturn and Mars, very near the ecliptic, as noted on our chart.

Arcturus and Regulus are not the only guidepost stars and asterisms in the May sky. Again, if you have been reading these posts for several months, be sure to find the stars and asterisms you found in earlier months. Early on a May evening these will include, from east to west, the following: Arcturus, Spica, Saturn, Leo’s Rump (triangle), The Sickle,  Mars, Regulus, the Beehive, Procyon, Sirius, Pollux, Castor, and in the northwest near the horizon, Capella, and the Kite. Venus will be a bright evening “star” in the west, and if you look early in the month you may catch a glimpse of Sirius and Betelgeuse before they set.

Look East in April 2014 – take a simple slide to the World’s Fair Star and bump into Mars as a bonus!

 

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The name”Arcturus” derives from Ancient Greek and means “Guardian of the Bear.” It is the brightest star in the constellation Boötes. Click image for a much larger version. (Prepared from Starry Nights Pro screen shot.)

 

Click here to download a printer-friendly version of the above chart.

Arcturus isn’t universally known as the “World’s Fair Star,”  but  it should be.  Its light bridged two World’s Fairs, making an astronomical link between the one in 1893  and a second in 1933 – both held in Chicago.  It’s intriguing that  the general public was excited enough about science – in the middle of the Great Depression – to make such a link attractive to the Fair’s promoters. Light from Arcturus  – believed at that time to be 40 light years away – was captured by the 40-inch refractor at Yerkes Observatory and its energy used to turn on the lights for the 1933 Fair.

This put the public spotlight not only on Arcturus, but it raised consciousness about the vast distance between us and that star, since the light being used had started its journey during the 1893 Fair and arrived just in time to start the next Fair. When you know light can circle the Earth more than seven times in a single second, you start to understand just what an incredible journey that was.

Of course Arcturus has many other distinctions. For one thing, it makes a perfect connection with the best known asterism in the sky, the Big Dipper.  To find it, all you have to remember is “follow the arc to Arcturus.

And in 2014 you get a bonus – keep following that arc and you’ll quickly come toa slightly brighter “star,” the planet Mars! More about that in our “events” post for April, but I did add Mars to this month’s “look east” chart. It forms a nice triangle with Arcturus and Spica, another bright star we’ll meet next month as it’s quite low this month.

Getting back to Arcturus – another way to remember where to find Arcturus is its name, derived from ancient Greek, which can be translated as “Bear Watcher.”  That’s because Arcturus looks like it’s keeping an eye on the “Great Bear,” Ursa Major, as both circle the northern pole.

You can also think of the magnitude system by which we rate the brightness of stars as starting near Arcturus. At magnitude minus .04 it’s about as close to zero as you can get – the minus sign indicating it is a tad brighter than zero.  Its absolute magnitude is also pretty close to zero since absolute magnitude is defined as how bright a star would be if it were about 33 light years from us, and by modern measurement Arcturus is now believed to be about 37.6 light years from us.  That makes its absolute magnitude -.29.

Arcturus has the distinction of being the brightest star in the northern celestial hemisphere, but this is splitting hairs in several ways. It means it’s the brightest star north of the celestial equator. Sirius, now over in the southwest, is obviously  brighter. But Sirius is south of the celestial equator. Both stars are located close enough to the celestial equator so they can be seen from most places on Earth.

It’s interesting to note, however, that Mars is outshining it this month- by quite a bit. In round numbers, Arcturus is zero, Mars is minus 1.2 and Sirius, setting in the est early on April evenings, is minus 1.5.

But Arcturus (-.04) also wins the “brightest star in the northern hemisphere” distinction by another hair. Remember that the lower the magnitude number, the brighter the star. Both Vega (.03) and Capella (.08) are north of the celestial equator, and the difference in brightness between Arcturus (-.04), Vega (.03), and Capella (.08) is roughly a tenth of a magnitude.  For practical purposes, they all look the same.  But in practical terms, making the comparison by naked eye is – well –  very impractical. Capella is currently fairly high in the northwest. But next month, when Vega is high enough in the east to see well,  Capella will be rather low in the northwest. At that time Arcturus should look brighter – but its actual brightness will be aided by the fact that it is high over head at that time, so you are seeing it while looking through a lot less air than you will be when looking at Vega or Capella. Besides, visually trying to compare stars that are this far apart in our sky is next to impossible since you have to look away from one to see the other. I simply think of all three as magnitude zero and leave the hair splitting to the scientists and their instruments.

Oops – we interrupt this program for a bulletin from 1907!

Yes, having just written how impractical the naked eye comparison is, I found this passage in “The Friendly Stars” by Martha Evans Martin, a book that was published more than a century ago:

Arcturus and Capella are so nearly equal in brightness that astronomers differ as to which outranks the other, even when they measure  their light with a supposedly accurate  instrument and a trained eye. To my own eye Arcturus outshines Capella, and on asking various inexperienced persons for off-hand opinions as to the relative brightness of the two stars, I have invariably had an answer in favor of Arcturus. The best authorities, however, make Capella a shade brighter.

Oh my! And now with 100 years of scientific progress, the verdict is that Martha Evans Martin and her causal observer friends were correct – and the “best authorities”  wrong. Arcturus is the brightest.  So much for my idea that you can’t tell the difference with the naked eye! Give it a try and see what you think. (You can find a chart for Capella and more details about that star  in this post.) Since we’re ranking stars, however, Arcturus is actually fourth on the list of brightest stars – two others that are ahead of it, Canopus and Rigel Kentaurus, are not seen by observers in mid-northern latitudes. Sirius, of course, is.

While Arcturus radiates a lot of energy, much of it is not in the form of visible light. It has what’s known as a “peculiar spectrum” and radiates much of its energy in the infrared portion of the spectrum.  This means that to our eyes it doesn’t look as bright as it really is.

Orange-ish Arcturus is 215 times as bright as our Sun and 25 times the Sun’s diameter. (Image courtesy of  Windows of the Universe.)

One more deception of sorts: This brightness is not because Arcturus is so big – well , yes it is, but not big in terms of the amount of stuff in it, but big in terms of surface area. If you’re measuring the amount of stuff that makes up Arcturus – its mass – it is about the same size as our Sun. But Arcturus has a much greater surface area, so think of it as a hugely bloated version of our Sun. (Keep that in mind when you look at the comparison sketch above.) It is a much older star and is now going through its red giant phase, something our Sun will probably do several billion years from now, burning the Earth to a cinder in the process.

Hmmm . . . to get an idea of how much impact that large surface area has, if you put our Sun out near Arcturus it would be barely visible to the naked eye – and then under truly dark –  not light polluted – skies.

Vital stats for Arcturus, also  known as Alpha Bootes:

•    Brilliance: Magnitude  -.04, brightest star in the celestial northern hemisphere; shines with the luminosity of 215 Suns.

•    Distance: 37 light years

•    Spectral Type: K1 Giant

•    Position: 14h:15m:38s, +19°:10′:5

Guideposts reminder

Each month you’re encouraged to learn the new “guidepost” stars and asterisms rising in the east about an hour after sunset. One reason for doing this is so you can then see how they move in the following months. So if you have been following – even if this is just your second month – look for the previous guidepost stars and asterisms that you have learned and that are still with us in April. Here’s the list from east to west.

  • Arcturus
  • Leo’s Rump  (triangle)
  • The Sickle
  • Regulus
  • the Beehive
  • Procyon
  • Sirius
  • Pollux
  • Castor
  • Betelegeuse
  • Orion’s Belt
  • Rigel
  • Capella
  • the Kite
  • Aldebaran
  • the Winter Hexagon
  • the Pleiades 

Look East! Drop off the slide to Spica and land on Saturn in May 2013!

If you followed “the arc” of the Big Dipper ‘s handle last month to find Arcturus, then you can do the same this month to find Spica – it’s like taking a long, cool slide from the Dipper – and if you hop off just before just before the end, this year you’ll land on Saturn!

Here’s how it looks – remember: look east  starting about an hour after Sunset.  But don’t wait too long – as the night goes on, everything will appear to rise and after a few hours this chart won’t be much help.

stuff

Start with the Big Dipper, high overhead tot he east. Following the arc of its handle, slide down to the brightest star int he east, Arcturus. Soften your slide and keep going and you’ll come to another bright star, Spica. Hopwever, if you hop off the slide just before getting to Spica, you’ll land on Saturn – which will be brighter than Spica, but not quite as bright as Arcturus.

Click here to download a printer-friendly version of this chart.

While the Dipper is easy to recognize, its stars are second magnitude – bright, but not the brightest. The brightest star in this section of the sky is Arcturus at magnitude zero. (Remember, the lower the magnitude number, the brighter the object.) The next brightest star you’ll see is over to your left, low in the northeast – Vega. In fact, Vega is magnitude  zero as well and the difference between it an Arcturus is next to impossible to detect with the eye. And this year we can say the same about Saturn  – it is over near  Spica and will outshine it by just a tad and be nearly as bright as Vega and Arcturus. All of these – Arcturus, Vega, Saturn, and Spica will be brighter than any of the Dipper stars.

As these stars get higher in the sky, you will notice that Spica is a rich blue, while Saturn has a yellow tint. About an hour after sunset Vega will be the lowest at about 20-degrees above the horizon – two fists held at arms length. Saturn will be about 23 degrees above the horizon, Spica about 30 degrees, Arcturus 47 degrees and Alkaid, the star at the end of the big Dipper’s handle, about 64 degrees.

We dealt with Arcturus last month. Saturn will be in our sky most of the night and as always is a treat for the small telescope user. From a naked eye perspective,  it’s fun to remember that the name “planet” means “wanderer” in Greek, but all “wanderers” are not created equal. Mars, Venus, and Mercury move  so quickly in our night sky that you can easily mark their changes over a period of a few days -certainly a week.  Saturn is much more sluggish.

Look at the chart and you’ll see how little Saturn changes position over the course of an entire year – it moves roughly 12 degrees.  To see this in the sky , find Saturn. Hold your fist at arms length so Saturn is just below it. Just above your fist is where Saturn was last year. Put Staurn on top of your fist and just below your fist is where it will be next year. So how long will it take Saturn to get around the sky to roughly the same position? Well, 360/12 = about 30 years!  Now if you think a moment, the Moon takes about 30 days to get around our sky – and that means the Moon moves each day about 12  degrees –  the same apparent distance covered by Saturn each year.  All of which should tell you that it would be reasonable to assume Saturn is much farther away from us than the Moon – which, of course, it is.

None of this is rocket science or in any way  profound, but I find it interesting to contemplate as I look up and see Saturn. I measure that distance it will travel in the next year and in my mind’s eye I perch above the Solar System and I see a long thin pie slice reaching from me to Saturn’s distance orbit and this helps me keep things in perspective – gives me a better intuitive feel for the neighborhood in which we live.  OK – for the record Saturn is moving at about 22,000 miles an hour, Mars about 54,000 miles an hour in a much shorter orbit, and we’re whipping right along close to 67,000 miles an hour – and we don’t even feel the wind in our face! Oh – and Saturn’s actual orbital period is 29.458 years.

On to this month’s new guidepost stars!

Vega and Spica are each fascinating stars, but let’s start with Vega. Shining brightly not far above the northeastern horizon as the evening begins, Vega comes about as close to defining the word “star” as you can get. In “The Hundred Greatest Stars” James Kaler calls it “the ultimate standard star” because its magnitude is about as close to zero as you can get (.03) and its color is about as close to white as you can get. (If you’re one of those who assumed all stars are white, you’re forgiven. Individuals vary in their ability to see different colors in stars and for everyone the color differences are subtle – in fact I think of them as tints rather than colors. )

It’s hard not to be attracted to Vega when you read Leslie Peltier’s wonderful autobiography, “Starlight Nights.” Vega was central to his astronomical observing throughout his career because he began with it when he first started reading the book from which I got the idea for this web site, “The Friendly Stars” by Martha Evans Martin. Peltier wrote:

According to the descriptive text Vega, at that very hour in the month of May, would be rising in the northeastern sky. I took the open book outside, walked around to the east side of the house, glanced once more at the diagram by the light that came through the east window of the kitchen, looked up towards the northeast and there, just above the plum tree blooming by the well, was Vega. And there she had been all the springtimes of my life, circling around the pole with her five attendant stars, fairly begging for attention, and I had never seen her.

Now I knew a star! It had been incredibly simple, and all the stars to follow were equally easy.

Vega went on to be the first target of the 2-inch telescope he bought with the $18 he made by raising and picking strawberries. (This was around 1915.) And Vega became the first target for every new telescope he owned until his death in 1980. If you still don’t know a star, go out and introduce yourself to Vega early on a May evening. Even without a plum tree to look over, you can’t miss her! And once you’ve done that you’re well on your way to making the night sky your own.  (And yes, Vega is the star from which the message comes in Carl Sagan’s book/movie “Contact.”)

Vital stats for Vega, also known as Alpha Lyrae:

• Brilliance: Magnitude .03 ; a standard among stars; total radiation is that of 54 Suns.
• Distance: 25 light years
• Spectral Type: A0 Dwarf
• Position: 18h:36m:56s, +38°:47′:01″

Spica, a really bright star – honest!

Spica is truly a very bright star, but the numbers you may read for its brightness can have you pulling your hair. That’s because there are at least four common ways to express the brightness of Spica and other stars, and writers don’t always tell you which way they’re using. So let’s look at these four ways and see what they mean for Spica.

The first is the most obvious. How bright does it look to you and me from our vantage point on Earth using our eyes alone? We then assign it a brightness using the magnitude system with the lower the number, the brighter star. (For full discussion of this system, see “How bright is that star?”)

By this measure Spica is 16th on the list of brightest stars and is about as close as you can come to being exactly magnitude 1. (Officially 1.04) Though I should add here that the number really marks the midpoint of a magnitude designation – that is, any star that is in the range of magnitude .5 to magnitude 1.5 is called “magnitude 1” and so on for the other numbers on the scale.

But that scale talks about what we see. It doesn’t account for distance. Obviously if you have two 60-watt light bulbs and one is shining 6 feet away from you and the other 1,000 feet away, they are not going to look the same brightness. But if we put them both at the same distance – say 100 feet – they would look the same. So it is with stars. To compare them we pretend they all were at the same distance – in this case 10 parsecs, which is about 32.6 light years. Put our Sun at that distance and it would be magnitude 4.83. (That’s about as faint as the fainest stars we see in the Little Dipper.) We call that its absolute magnitude.

The absolute magnitude for Spica is -3.55 – not quite as bright as dazzling Venus.

Wow! That’s pretty bright compared to our Sun! Yes it is. Sun 4.83; Spica -3.55. Don’t miss the “minus” sign in front of Spica’s number! That means there’s more than eight magnitudes difference between the Sun and Spica. And that relates to the next figure you are likely to see quoted. Something that is called its luminosity. Luminosity compares the brightness of a star to the brightness of our Sun. Unfortunately, the term is often misused – or poorly defined. Thus in the Wikipedia article I just read on Spica it said that “Spica has a luminosity about 2,300 times that of the Sun.” Yes, but what does that mean? It means that if we were to put the two side by side, Spica would appear to our eyes to be 2,300 times as bright as our Sun.

That is bright! But there’s more, much more. Spica is also a very hot star – in fact one of the brightest hot stars that we see with our naked eyes. But we miss most of that brightness because most of it is being radiated in forms of energy that our eyes don’t detect. In the case of Spica, that is largely ultraviolet energy. The Wikipedia article actually listed Spica’s luminosity twice, and the second time it gave it as “13,400/1,700.”

Oh boy – now we have Spica not 2,300 times as bright as the Sun, but more than 13,000 times as bright. Now that IS bright – but is it right? Yes! So why the difference? Again, the first “luminosity” given – 2,300 times that of the Sun – is measuring only what we can see with our eyes. The second is measuring total amount of electromagnetic radiation a star radiates and is properly called the “bolometric luminosity.” And why two numbers for that last figure? 13,400/1,700? Because while Spica looks like one star to us, it is really two stars that are very close together and one is much brighter than the other. So what we see as one star is really putting out energy in the neighborhood of 15,100 times as much as our Sun.

This can get confusing, so I suggest you remember three things about Spica.

1. It defines first magnitude, having a brightness as it appears to us of 0.98 – closer than any other star to magnitude 1.

2. It is really far brighter (magnitude -3.55), but appears dim because it is far away – about 250 light years by the most recent measurements.

3. It is very hot – appearing blue to our eyes – and because it is very hot it is actually radiating a lot more energy in wavelengths we don’t see, so it is far, far brighter than our Sun.

Spica is the brightest star in the constellation Virgo, one of those constellations where you can not really connect the dots and form a picture of a virgin unless you have an over abundance of imagination. Besides, the remaining stars are relatively faint. That’s why we focus on the bright stars and sometimes those simple patterns known as “asterisms” and use them as our guides.

Vital stats for Spica, also known as Alpha Virgo:

• Brilliance: Magnitude .98 ; as close to magnitude 1 as any star gets; a close double whose combined radiation is the equal of 15,100 Suns.
• Distance: 250 light years
• Spectral Types: B1,B4 Dwarfs
• Position: 13h:25m:12s, -11°:09′:41″

Guideposts reminder

Each month you’re encouraged to learn the new “guidepost” stars rising in the east about an hour after sunset. One reason for doing this is so you can then see how they move in the following months. If you have been reading these posts for several months, you may want to relate Spica to two earlier guidepost stars with which it forms a right triangle, Arcturus and Regulus. Here’s what that triangle looks like.

Click image for larger view. (Created, with modifications, from Starry Nights Pro screen shot.)

Click here to download a printer-friendly version of this chart.

Once you have identified the Right Triangle, note carefully the positions of Spica and Regulus. They pretty much mark the “ecliptic.” This is the path followed by the Sun. Also, within about 9 degrees north or south of it, you will find the planets and the Moon. That’s well illustrated in 2012 by the presence of both Saturn and Mars, very near the ecliptic, as noted on our chart.

Arcturus and Regulus are not the only guidepost stars and asterisms in the May sky. Again, if you have been reading these posts for several months, be sure to find the stars and asterisms you found in earlier months. Early on a May evening these will include, from east to west, the following: Arcturus, Spica, Saturn, Leo’s Rump (triangle), The Sickle,  Mars, Regulus, the Beehive, Procyon, Sirius, Pollux, Castor, and in the northwest near the horizon, Capella, and the Kite. Venus will be a bright evening “star” in the west, and if you look early in the month you may catch a glimpse of Sirius and Betelgeuse before they set.

Look East in April 2013 – take a simple slide to the World’s Fair Star!

The name"Arcturus" derives from Ancient Greek and means "Guardian of the Bear." It is the brightest star in the constellation Boötes. Click image for a much larger version. (Prepared from Starry Nights Pro screen shot.)

The name”Arcturus” derives from Ancient Greek and means “Guardian of the Bear.” It is the brightest star in the constellation Boötes. Click image for a much larger version. (Prepared from Starry Nights Pro screen shot.)

Click here to download a printer-friendly version of the above chart.

Arcturus isn’t universally known as the “World’s Fair Star,”  but  it should be.  Its light bridged two World’s Fairs, making an astronomical link between the one in 1893  and a second in 1933 – both held in Chicago.  It’s intriguing that  the general public was excited enough about science – in the middle of the Great Depression – to make such a link attractive to the Fair’s promoters. Light from Arcturus  – believed at that time to be 40 light years away – was captured by the 40-inch refractor at Yerkes Observatory and its energy used to turn on the lights for the 1933 Fair.

This put the public spotlight not only on Arcturus, but it raised consciousness about the vast distance between us and that star, since the light being used had started its journey during the 1893 Fair and arrived just in time to start the next Fair. When you know light can circle the Earth more than seven times in a single second, you start to understand just what an incredible journey that was.

Of course Arcturus has many other distinctions. For one thing, it makes a perfect connection with the best known asterism in the sky, the Big Dipper.  To find it, all you have to remember is “follow the arc to Arcturus.

Another way to remember where to find Arcturus is its name, derived from ancient Greek, which can be translated as “Bear Watcher.”  That’s because Arcturus looks like it’s keeping an eye on the “Great Bear,” Ursa Major, as both circle the northern pole.

You can also think of the magnitude system by which we rate the brightness of stars as starting near Arcturus. At magnitude -.04 it’s about as close to zero as you can get – the minus sign indicating it is a tad brighter than zero.  Its absolute magnitude is also pretty close to zero since absolute magnitude is defined as how bright a star would be if it were about 33 light years from us, and by modern measurement Arcturus is now believed to be about 37.6 light years from us.  That makes its absolute magnitude -.29.

Arcturus has the distinction of being the brightest star in the northern celestial hemisphere, but this is splitting hairs in several ways. It means it’s the brightest star north of the celestial equator. Sirius, now over in the southwest, is obviously  brighter. But Sirius is south of the celestial equator. Both stars are located close enough to the celestial equator so they can be seen from most places on Earth.

But Arcturus (-.04) also wins this “brightest star in the northern hemisphere” distinction by another hair. Remember that the lower the magnitude number, the brighter the star. Both Vega (.03) and Capella (.08) are north of the celestial equator, and the difference in brightness between Arcturus (-.04), Vega (.03), and Capella (.08) is roughly a tenth of a magnitude.  For practical purposes, they all look the same.  But in practical terms, making the comparison by naked eye is – well –  very impractical. Capella is currently fairly high in the northwest. But next month, when Vega is high enough in the east to see well,  Capella will be rather low in the northwest. At that time Arcturus should look brighter – but its actual brightness will be aided by the fact that it is high over head at that time, so you are seeing it while looking through a lot less air than you will be when looking at Vega or Capella. Besides, visually trying to compare stars that are this far apart in our sky is next to impossible since you have to look away from one to see the other. I simply think of all three as magnitude zero and leave the hair splitting to the scientists and their instruments.

Oops – we interrupt this program for a bulletin from 1907!

Yes, having just written how impractical the naked eye comparison is, I found this passage in “The Friendly Stars” by Martha Evans Martin, a book that was published more than a century ago:

Arcturus and Capella are so nearly equal in brightness that astronomers differ as to which outranks the other, even when they measure  their light with a supposedly accurate  instrument and a trained eye. To my own eye Arcturus outshines Capella, and on asking various inexperienced persons for off-hand opinions as to the relative brightness of the two stars, I have invariably had an answer in favor of Arcturus. The best authorities, however, make Capella a shade brighter.

Oh my! And now with 100 years of scientific progress, the verdict is that Martha Evans Martin and her causal observer friends were correct – and the “best authorities”  wrong. Arcturus is the brightest.  So much for my idea that you can’t tell the difference with the naked eye! Give it a try and see what you think. (You can find a chart for Capella and more details about that star  in this post.) Since we’re ranking stars, however, Arcturus is actually fourth on the list of brightest stars – two others that are ahead of it, Canopus and Rigel Kentaurus, are not seen by observers in mid-northern latitudes.Sirius, of course, is.

While Arcturus radiates a lot of energy, much of it is not in the form of visible light. It has what’s known as a “peculiar spectrum” and radiates much of its energy in the infrared portion of the spectrum.  This means that to our eyes it doesn’t look as bright as it really is.

Orange-ish Arcturus is 215 times as bright as our Sun and 25 times the Sun’s diameter. (Image courtesy of  Windows of the Universe.)

One more deception of sorts: This brightness is not because Arcturus is so big – well , yes it is, but not big in terms of the amount of stuff in it, but big in terms of surface area. If you’re measuring the amount of stuff that makes up Arcturus – its mass – it is about the same size as our Sun. But Arcturus has a much greater surface area, so think of it as a hugely bloated version of our Sun. (Keep that in mind when you look at the comparison sketch above.) It is a much older star and is now going through its red giant phase, something our Sun will probably do several billion years from now, burning the Earth to a cinder in the process.

Hmmm . . . to get an idea of how much impact that large surface area has, if you put our Sun out near Arcturus it would be barely visible to the naked eye – and then under truly dark –  not light polluted – skies.

Vital stats for Arcturus, also  known as Alpha Bootes:

•    Brilliance: Magnitude  -.04, brightest star in the celestial northern hemisphere; shines with the luminosity of 215 Suns.

•    Distance: 37 light years

•    Spectral Type: K1 Giant

•    Position: 14h:15m:38s, +19°:10′:5

Guideposts reminder

Each month you’re encouraged to learn the new “guidepost” stars and asterisms rising in the east about an hour after sunset. One reason for doing this is so you can then see how they move in the following months. So if you have been following – even if this is just your second month – look for the previous guidepost stars and asterisms that you have learned and that are still with us in April. Here’s the list from east to west.

  • Arcturus
  • Leo’s Rump  (triangle)
  • The Sickle
  • Regulus
  • the Beehive
  • Procyon
  • Sirius
  • Pollux
  • Castor
  • Betelegeuse
  • Orion’s Belt
  • Rigel
  • Capella
  • the Kite
  • Aldebaran
  • the Winter Hexagon
  • the Pleiades 

Look East in April 2012 – take a simple slide to the World’s Fair Star and continue on to Saturn!

In 1933 it was believed Arcturus was 40 light years from us, so it was appropriare to use it's light, which would have begun it's journey when the 1893 World's Fair was in progress, to turn ont he lights for the 1933 Fair. The 40-inch telescope as Yerkes Observatory captured the energy from Arcturus to do this. Click image for larger view.

Arcturus isn’t universally known as the “World’s Fair Star,”  but  it should be.  Its light bridged two World’s Fairs, making a physical link between the one in 1893  and a second in 1933 – both held in Chicago.  It’s intriguing that  the general public was excited enough about science – in the middle of the Great Depression – to make such a link attractive to the Fair’s promoters. Light from Arcturus  – believed at that time to be 40 light years away – was captured by the 40-inch refractor at Yerkes Observatory and used to turn on the lights for the 1933 Fair.

This put the public spotlight not only on Arcturus, but it raised consciousness about the vast distance between us and that star, since the light being used had started its journey during the 1893 Fair and arrived just in time to start the next Fair. When you know light can circle the Earth more than seven times in a single second, you start to understand just what an incredible journey that was.

Of course Arcturus has many other distinctions. For one thing, it makes a perfect connection with the best known asterism in the sky, the Big Dipper.  To find it, all you have to remember is “follow the arc to Arcturus.”  What’s real cool this April is you can slide on down from the Dipper’s handle to Arcturus, then keep sliding along the same curve and you will hit another bright “star,” Saturn. At the beginning of the month you’ll have to wait until about two hour after sunset for this to be easy, but by mid month it should be obvious an hour or so after sunset assuming you have an unobstructed eastern horizon.  Saturn will be about one fist  – 10 degrees – above the horizon then.  And by the end of the month it will be higher still.

The name"Arcturus" derives from Ancient Greek and means "Guardian of the Bear." It is the brightest star in the constellation Boötes. Click image for a much larger version. (Prepared from Starry Nights Pro screen shot.)

Another way to remember where to find Arcturus is its name, derived from ancient Greek, which can be translated as “Bear Watcher.”  That’s because Arcturus looks like it’s keeping an eye on the “Great Bear,” Ursa Major, as both circle the northern pole.

You can also think of the magnitude system by which we rate the brightness of stars as starting near Arcturus. At magnitude -.04 it’s very close to zero.  Its absolute magnitude is also pretty close to zero since absolute magnitude is defined as how bright a star would be if it were about 33 light years from us, and Arcturus is actually about 37.6 light years from us.  That makes its absolute magnitude -.29.

Arcturus has the distinction of being the brightest star in the northern celestial hemisphere, but this is splitting hairs in several ways. It means it’s the brightest star north of the celestial equator. Sirius, now over in the southwest, is obviously  brighter. But Sirius is south of the celestial equator. Both stars are located close enough to the celestial equator so they can be seen from most places on Earth.

But Arcturus (-.04) also wins this “brightest star in the northern hemisphere” distinction by another hair. Remember that the lower the magnitude number, the brighter the star. Both Vega (.03) and Capella (.08) are north of the celestial equator, and the difference in brightness between Arcturus (-.04), Vega (.03), and Capella (.08) is only a tad more than a tenth of a magnitude.  For practical purposes, they all look the same.  But in practical terms, making the comparison by naked eye is – well –  very impractical. Capella is currently fairly high in the northwest. But next month, when Vega is high enough in the east to see well,  Capella will be rather low in the northwest. At that time Arcturus should look brighter – but its actual brightness will be aided by the fact that it is high over head at that time, so you are seeing it while looking through a lot less air than you will be when looking at Vega or Capella. Besides, visually trying to compare stars that are this far apart is next to impossible. I simply think of all three as magnitude zero and leave the hair splitting to the scientists and their instruments.

Oops – we interrupt this program for a bulletin from 1907!

Yes, having just written how impractical the naked eye comparison is, I found this passage in “The Friendly Stars” by Martha Evans Martin, a book that was published more than a century ago:

Arcturus and Capella are so nearly equal in brightness that astronomers differ as to which outranks the other, even when they measure  their light with a supposedly accurate  instrument and a trained eye. To my own eye Arcturus outshines Capella, and on asking various inexperienced persons for off-hand opinions as to the relative brightness of the two stars, I have invariably had an answer in favor of Arcturus. The best authorities, however, make Capella a shade brighter.

Oh my! And now with 100 years of scientific progress, the verdict is that Martha Evans Martin and her causal observer friends were correct – and the “best authorities”  wrong. Arcturus is the brightest.  So much for my idea that you can’t tell the difference with the naked eye! Give it a try and see what you think. (You can find a chart for Capella and more details about that star  in this post.) Since we’re ranking stars, however, Arcturus is actually fourth on the list of brightest stars – two others that are ahead of it, Canopus and Rigel Kentaurus, are not seen by observers in mid-northern latitudes.

While Arcturus radiates a lot of energy, much of it is not in the form of visible light. It has what’s known as a “peculiar spectrum” and radiates much of its energy in the infrared portion of the spectrum.  This means that to our eyes it doesn’t look as bright as it really is.

Orange-ish Arcturus is 215 times as bright as our Sun and 25 times the Sun’s diameter. (Image courtesy of  Windows of the Universe.)

One more deception of sorts: This brightness is not because Arcturus is so big – well , yes it is, but not big in terms of the amount of stuff in it, but big in terms of surface area. If you’re measuring the amount of stuff that makes up Arcturus – its mass – it is about the same size as our Sun. But Arcturus has a much greater surface area, so think of it as a hugely bloated version of our Sun. (Keep that in mind when you look at the comparison sketch above.) It is a much older star and is now going through its red giant phase, something our Sun will probably do several billion years from now, burning the Earth to a cinder in the process.

Vital stats for Arcturus, also  known as Alpha Bootes:

•    Brilliance: Magnitude  -.04, brightest star in the celestial northern hemisphere; shines with the luminosity of 215 Suns.

•    Distance: 37 light years

•    Spectral Type: K1 Giant

•    Position: 14h:15m:38s, +19°:10′:5

Guideposts reminder

Each month you’re encouraged to learn the new “guidepost” stars and asterisms rising in the east about an hour after sunset. One reason for doing this is so you can then see how they move in the following months. So if you have been following – even if this is just your second month – look for the previous guidepost stars and asterisms that you have learned and that are still with us in April. Here’s the list from east to west.

Arcturus, Leo’s Rump  (triangle), The Sickle, Regulus, the Beehive, Mars, Procyon, Sirius, Pollux, Castor, Betelegeuse, Orion’s Belt, Rigel, Capella, the Kite, Aldebaran, the Winter Hexagon, the Pleiades.

The “March” of the Planets – they’re just Wild in the West in March 2012 – what you’ll see and why!

March starts off with a double-barreled planetary bang as Venus and Jupiter  meet and dance briefly, while just below them Mercury puts in its best appearance of the year zipping up for an easy look, then zipping back down.

First we’ll describe what you can see in a few simple charts, then we’ll delve into why you see it on the premise that the actual sight is much more exciting if you know what’s really going on back stage!  ( We also have a neat appearance by Mars in the eastern sky and Saturn in the morning sky, but more on that later. Oh – and while Mercury favors northern hemisphere observers this month, those in the south do see a good Jupiter/Venus show.)

What you’ ll see – March 1 -15

Go out a few minutes before sunset to a point where you have an unobstructed western horizon. Bring binoculars if you like – even a small telescope, though the naked eye gives a terrific view of this show. First, enjoy the sunset – get a sense of the Earth turning beneath your feet, and where the Sun is as it sets – though don’t look directly at it and certainly do NOT point telescope or binoculars there.  Wait 15-30 minutes and here’s what you should see in the twilight.

March gets going with a bang with this great planetary lineup in the western sky - the highlight of which is fleeting and elusive Mercury. Like all the star charts in this post, this was prepared from Starry Nights Pro screenshot. Click any star chart image for a larger view.

Yes, that’s my fist in the foreground. But you can use yours to help you find Mercury, the faintest of these three bright planets. Mercury will be about 10 degrees above the horizon, half an hour after sunset.  Hold your fist at arm’s length and you will cover about 10 degrees. (Yes, smaller people – or larger – have different size fists, but the proportions of arm length to fist size stay the same so this generally works.)  If you see this planetary line up, here are some things to notice.

First, look at the relative brightness of the three planets:

  • Venus is the brightest of the three by far. It glows at magnitude -4.3. Only the Moon and Sun are brighter.
  • Jupiter is next in brightness at -2.2 – brighter than any star gets.
  • Mercury is near its brightest at -.9 – but that makes it dimmer than the brightest star, now high in the south, Sirius – it’s about half a magnitude brighter.  And the fact that Mercury is so low and in bright twilight will make it more difficult to see. Binoculars will help find it, but it should be quite easily seen with the naked eye, especially when you know where to look.

Second. use your fist held at arms length (see chart) to note how high Mercury is above the horizon. This will change rapidly over the next 10 days.

Third, use your fist to estimate the distance between Jupiter and Venus. (One fist is 10 degrees.) This too will change rapidly over the next two weeks as Jupiter “falls” towards Venus and Venus  appears to quickly climb towards Jupiter.

Here are some charts at five day intervals to show the changes you can expect to see.

March 5, 2012

March 10, 2012

March 15, 2012

 So why do the planets appear where and when they do and why does Mercury change so rapidly in both position and brightness. Hop in your spaceship and zoom to a point well over the Sun so you can look down on our Solar System and watch the planets revolve.  That will give you the answer.

The two planets closer to the Sun than us – Venus and Mercury – revolve the fastest and have the shortest orbits.  They also pass between us and the Sun and thus go through phases like our Moon because we only see part of the sunlit portion of the planet as this happens. The outer planets, including Mars, Jupiter , and Saturn (all visible in our skies in March) don’t go through such phases and they change position more slowly – especially Jupiter and Saturn.

So let’s start with an overview showing where we and the other planets are on March 1, 2012. (All of these views are taken from the Orrery at  “Solar System Live” – a web site I heartily recommend you visit often and play with by changing the dates, etc., as encouraged at that site.)

March 1, 2012 – the entire Solar System

e

In this first view you need to imagine yourself on Earth. The Sun has just set, but you can see that when you look in the general direction of the Sun (west) you will see Mercury very close to it, Venus a bit farther away, and Jupiter farther away still.  If you turn around and look East you will see Mars near the Eastern horizon. Saturn is to the east as well, but will not be seen until near midnight and is really a morning sky object.

If you could look at the three bright planets in the Western sky with a small telescope, they would look something like the following picture.

c

To see the phases of Venus and Mercury in a small telescope it is best to catch them in twilight – start about 10 minutes after sunset -again, be careful not to look at the Sun with your telescope as your eyes would be severely damaged. Wait until the Sun is well below the horizon.  Venus gets so bright once it is fully dark that it tends to dazzle and dance and it is more difficult to see the phases then.  Mercury, on the other hand, is seldom high enough to get a good look because you are looking through so much atmosphere – but this is the best chance to see it in 2012. The relative sizes you see here are roughly the way they would appear in a telescope – they don’t represent the actual size difference of the planets because Jupiter – the largest by far – is much farther from us than either Venus or Mercury and so appears smaller than it really is.

March 5, 2012 – dance of the inner planets

In the following sequence you will see the Orrery view of Earth and the inner planets, as well as a view of what we see in the sky on each date  and how the phases of Mercury are changing. These changes in phase should make clear why the planet appears dimmer with each day after  March 5. On March 15 it will be quite difficult to see, as it will not only be close to the horizon, but it will have fallen in brightness almost two full magnitudes – that’s roughly the same difference in brightness you see between Jupiter and Venus – quite a change!

Western sky planets March 5, 2012 with inset showing how Mercury would appear in a small telescope.

Notice how Mercury is getting between us and the Sun - soon it will be lost in the Sun's glare.

Mercury is now (March 15) quite low, quite faint, and very difficult to see - and no wonder - just a slither of its sunlit face is visible to us as it comes near to passing between us and the Sun.

Mars and Saturn

Mars is an easy shot, visible in the east right after sunset, though it will be easier to see if you wait an hour or two. Use the chart in the “Look East” post here.  Mars gets close to us every two years, but not all “close” approaches are the same. Mars has an eliptical orbit and sometimes we hit it – as we are in 2012 – when it is closest to us, yet about as far as it gets from the Sun. That means it’s around 65 million miles form us this month. In some years it can be almosy half that distance from us, so while amateur astronomers will train their telescopes on it this month, it will appear relatively small.

Saturn is a wonderful sight in a small telescope and you can easily find it in the morning sky with the naked eye. Here’s a chart for a couple hours before sunrise at mid-month. Note that it is pretty close to one of our bright, guidepost stars, Spica, and they are roughly equal in brightness.

The early morning sky to the southwest is rich in bright stars and planets. Prepared from screenshot of Starry Nights Pro software. Click image for larger version.

For a printer friendly version of this chart, click here.

If you studied the “Look East” post this month you met  Regulus, Mars, the Sickle and Triangle of Leo in the early evening sky. Now as Sunrise approaches they are nearing the Western horizon.  Saturn and Spica make a nice pair in the southwest that are hard to miss, with bright Arcturus above them and the brilliant, reddish guidepost star, Antares about due south.

Look East: April 2011 brings the World’s Fair Star and Saturn!

In 1933 it was believed Arcturus was 40 light years from us, so it was appropriare to use its light, which would have begun its journey when the 1893 World's Fair was in progress, to turn on the lights for the 1933 Fair. The 40-inch telescope at Yerkes Observatory captured the energy from Arcturus to do this. Click image for larger view.

Arcturus isn’t universally known as the “World’s Fair Star,”  but  it should be.  Its light bridged two World’s Fairs , making a physical link between the one in 1893  and a second in 1933 – both held in Chicago.  It’s intriguing that  the general public was excited enough about science – in the middle of the Great Depression – to make such a link attractive to the Fair’s promoters. Light from Arcturus  – believed at that time to be 40 light years away – was captured by the 40-inch refractor at Yerkes Observatory and used to turn on the lights for the 1933 Fair.

This put the public spotlight not only on Arcturus, but it raised consciousness about the vast distance between us and that star, since the light being used had started its journey during the 1893 Fair and arrived just in time to start the next Fair. When you know light can circle the Earth more than seven times in a single second, you start to understand just what an incredible journey that was.

Of course Arcturus has many other distinctions. For one thing, it makes a perfect connection with the best known asterism in the sky, the Big Dipper.  To find it, all you have to remember is “follow the arc to Arcturus.”  That should keep you from confusing it with the bright “star” to the south of it shortly after sunset on these April 2011 nights – the ringed planet Saturn. Saturn will be about the same altitude as Arcturus, but 30 degrees (about three fists held at arm’s length – to the south. Even binoculars won’t reveal the trademark rings, however – for that you need a small telescope. Here’s the chart.

The name"Arcturus" derives from Ancient Greek and means "Guardian of the Bear." It is the brightest star in the constellation Boötes. Click image for a much larger version. (Prepared from Starry Nights Pro screen shot.)

Click here to download a printer-friendly version of the above chart.

Another way to remember where to find Arcturus is its name, derived from ancient Greek, which can be translated as “Bear Watcher.”  That’s because Arcturus looks like it’s keeping an eye on the “Great Bear,” Ursa Major, as both circle the northern pole.

You can also think of the magnitude system by which we rate the brightness of stars as starting near Arcturus. At magnitude -.04 it’s very close to zero.  Its absolute magnitude is also pretty close to zero since absolute magnitude is defined as how bright a star would be if it were about 33 light years from us, and Arcturus is actually about 37.6 light years from us.  That makes its absolute magnitude -.29.

Arcturus has the distinction of being the brightest star in the northern celestial hemisphere, but this is splitting hairs in several ways. It means it’s the brightest star north of the celestial equator. Sirius, now over in the southwest, is obviously  brighter. But Sirius is south of the celestial equator. Both stars are located close enough to the celestial equator so they can be seen from most places on Earth.

But Arcturus (-.04) also wins this “brightest star in the northern hemisphere” distinction by another hair. Remember that the lower the magnitude number, the brighter the star. Both Vega (.03) and Capella (.08) are north of the celestial equator, and the difference in brightness between Arcturus (-.04), Vega (.03), and Capella (.08) is only a tad more than a tenth of a magnitude.  For practical purposes, they all look the same.  But in practical terms, making the comparison by naked eye is – well –  very impractical. Capella is currently fairly high in the northwest. But next month, when Vega is high enough in the east to see well,  Capella will be rather low in the northwest. At that time Arcturus should look brighter – but its actual brightness will be aided by the fact that it is high over head at that time, so you are seeing it while looking through a lot less air than you will be when looking at Vega or Capella. Besides, visually trying to compare stars that are this far apart is next to impossible. I simply think of all three as magnitude zero and leave the hair splitting to the scientists and their instruments.

Oops – we interrupt this program for a bulletin from 1907!

Yes, having just written how impractical the naked eye comparison is, I found this passage in “The Friendly Stars” by Martha Evans Martin, a book that was published more than a century ago:

Arcturus and Capella are so nearly equal in brightness that astronomers differ as to which outranks the other, even when they measure  their light with a supposedly accurate  instrument and a trained eye. To my own eye Arcturus outshines Capella, and on asking various inexperienced persons for off-hand opinions as to the relative brightness of the two stars, I have invariably had an answer in favor of Arcturus. The best athorities, however, make Capella a shade brighter.

Oh my! And now with 100 years of scientific progress, the verdict is that Martha Evans Martin and her causal observer friends were correct – and the “best authorities”  wrong. Arcturus is the brightest.  So much for my idea that you can’t tell the difference with the naked eye! Give it a try and see what you think. (You can find a chart for Capella and more details about that star  in this post.) Since we’re ranking stars, however, Arcturus is actually fourth on the list of brightest stars – two others that are ahead of it, Canopus and Rigel Kentaurus, are not seen by observers in mid-northern latitudes.

While Arcturus radiates a lot of energy, much of it is not in the form of visible light. It has what’s known as a “peculiar spectrum” and radiates much of its energy in the infrared portion of the spectrum.  This means that to our eyes it doesn’t look as bright as it really is.

Orange-ish Arcturus is 215 times as bright as our Sun and 25 times the Sun's diameter. (Image courtesy of Windows of the Universe.)

One more deception of sorts: This brightness is not because Arcturus is so big – well , yes it is, but not big in terms of the amount of stuff in it, but big in terms of surface area. If you’re measuring the amount of stuff that makes up Arcturus – its mass – it is about the same size as our Sun. But Arcturus has a much greater surface area, so think of it as a hugely bloated version of our Sun. (Keep that in mind when you look at the comparison sketch above.) It is a much older star and is now going through its red giant phase, something our Sun will probably do several billion years from now, burning the Earth to a cinder in the process.

Vital stats for Arcturus, also  known as Alpha Bootes:

•    Brilliance: Magnitude  -.04, brightest star in the celestial northern hemisphere; shines with the luminosity of 215 Suns.

•    Distance: 37 light years

•    Spectral Type: K1 Giant

•    Position: 14h:15m:38s, +19°:10′:5

Guideposts reminder

Each month you’re encouraged to learn the new “guidepost” stars and asterisms rising in the east about an hour after sunset. One reason for doing this is so you can then see how they move in the following months. So if you have been following – even if this is just your second month – look for the previous guidepost stars and asterisms that you have learned and that are still with us in April. Here’s the list from east to west.

Arcturus, Leo’s Rump  (triangle), The Sickle, Regulus, the Beehive, Mars, Procyon, Sirius, Pollux, Castor, Betelegeuse, Orion’s Belt, Rigel, Capella, the Kite, Aldebaran, the Winter Hexagon, the Pleiades.

Coloring the stars – an exercise for all seasons

Trying to identify the true colors of stars, as we see them, is fun, challenging, and instructive.

Your assignment, should you choose to accept it, is to develop accurate color swatches that represent the colors of the bright stars, including our Sun, as they actually are seen and in so doing learn:

  • How to see color in the stars
  • What the color tells us about each star

The chart shows the Winter Hexagon because many of the brightest stars can be seen there all at one time, but it also includes swatches for several bright stars that are prominent in the spring, summer, and fall.

This image of the Winter Hexagon was taken by Jimmy Westlake looking at the skies over Stagecoach, Colorado. Look carefully and you can see color in some of the stars - especially if you click on the image to see the larger version. (Copyright © 2007-2011 JRWjr Astrophotography. All rights reserved.)

Star colors are real. They relate to a star’s temperature and from them we can surmise much more about a star. But they also are very subtle. I think of them not as colors, but as tints. I see stars essentially as white lights to which a little color has been added to tint it one way or another. I believe most people don’t see the colors at all when they first look at the stars and this can be frustrating, especially if you’ve read that Betelgeuse, for example, is an “orange” star.

With the naked eye you only will see color on the brightest stars because our eye simply needs a lot of light to detect color. In fact, point your binoculars at those bright stars, and you should find it easier to detect the colors because the binoculars gather more light. You can train yourself to see star colors, though people do differ in this ability. But for most, the colors are really quite obvious on some of the brighter stars, once you know what you can expect to see. And that’s what this little exercise is for – learning what you can expect to see.

Your main tools will be the chart and the color table provided here. You’ll have to provide the primary colors (red, yellow, and blue), plus white in some easily blendable medium, such as common water, tempera, or poster paints. Nothing fancy needed and no special painting skills required.

First, here’s the chart you will be coloring.

You can download a version for printing by clicking here.

And here’s the color table you will use as your guide

Your task is simple.

Next to each star on the star chart is its spectral classification. This consists of a letter and number. The letters go from blue to red stars in this order: OBAFGKM. Each letter gets divided into a numerical sub-classification from 0-9. So a “B0” star would be just at the beginning of the “B” category. A “B9” star would be at the end of that category and almost into the next one. The star chart shows the spectral classification for each star. Match that with what you see in the color table. Then determine its color.

You will notice that there are two different color scales in the table. That’s because the way we see color depends in part upon the environment in which we see it. The “conventional color” is what would be seen if the star were put under high magnification and projected onto a white sheet of paper in the daylight. The “apparent color” is what is seen by the naked eye in a dark sky. That is the color you want. That’s what you’ll try to duplicate by mixing your water colors and painting the swatch next to each star so it matches its classification – and thus what you are likely to see in the night sky.

The result will be a chart that will help you know what color to expect to see when you look at the stars in the sky. I should add that if you see a photograph of these stars, the colors will be similar, but different. That’s because the colors in a photograph depend on the color sensitivity of the film or computer chip used to record them – which is not the same as your eye. So you cannot use a photograph as an absolute guide to what you will see. The chart you make, if done well, will be a much better guide.

When you look for star color, make sure the star is high in your sky – hopefully at least 30 degrees or more above the horizon. All bright stars near the horizon will appear to flash many brilliant colors. Those colors – like the colors in our sunrises and sunsets – are caused by the Earth’s atmosphere. When you are looking at an object near the horizon, you are looking through much more air than when you are looking at a star high overhead.

Of course, you are going to have to use your judgment in making the color swatches, and you might experiment a bit on another piece of paper. That’s why I recommend using some sort of water color for this activity – so it’s easy to blend and thin your colors to get the color you want – the one that is closest to what you actually see. Of course to get orange you mix the yellow and red – and white will come in handy to lighten any of the colors.

Get the idea? Will your colors be perfect? I doubt it. But experimenting this way will give you a much better feel for how subtle star colors are and exactly what you are looking for when you go out at night. Too often people are confused and disappointed because they read that Betelgeuse or Aldebaran is a red or orange star – and when they read that, they are thinking of the conventional red or orange – quite naturally – but look at the chart and look at the difference between conventional colors and apparent colors.

More about a star’s spectral class

OBAFGKM is certainly a crazy order, I know. It started out to be an alphabetical list more than a century ago. But as they learned more about the stars, the letters got scrambled. Here’s an easy way to remember the order:

Oh Be A Fine Girl/Guy Kiss Me

At first they thought letters would be enough, but the more they learned about stars, the more they saw there were many subtle variations that were important. So for each letter there is a sub-classification system that goes from 0-9. Thus an O9.5 star, such as Mintaka, is in the “O” spectral class (blue) but about as close as one can get to being a “B” (blue white) star. Don’t be too concerned about these numbers, however. You’ll find it difficult enough just to get colors that accurately match the letter classifications. Besides, I’ve found that different sources sometimes give different numbers for the spectral classification of a specific star, so I see them as a good rough guide as to how solidly a star is into a specific class but not something to take overly seriously in terms of what we can detect with our eyes.

Mintaka, incidentally, is included here because bright “O” stars are hard to find. Mintaka was one of the easiest “O” star to identify, being the western-most star in Orion’s Belt. But coincidentally, Ainitak, the star at the other end of the belt, is also an”O” and  a bit brighter. But ay O9.7 it, too, just makes it into the “O” class by the skin of its teeth. In fact, it’s a bit closer to being a “B” star than Mintaka – but I guarantee you won’t see any difference.

“M” stars are even more difficult to find. True, Betelgeuse is one in the Winter Hexagon, and  in the summer we have another brilliant “M” star – Antares, the brightest star in the Scorpion.  But these are special. They both are Supergiants – stars that are going through their death throes and have expanded tremendously.  The vast majority of “M” stars are of average size, and in fact, these average-sized “M” stars are the most common stars in the universe – yet there is not a single “normal” class “M” star visible to our naked eye, let alone as bright as the stars that form the Winter Hexagon.

I also added our Sun to the chart. DO NOT LOOK AT THE SUN TO TRY TO DETERMINE COLOR. YOU WILL DAMAGE YOUR EYES. We were all taught as children to color our Sun yellow – and this is correct if you are talking about conventional color. But the Sun is a class G2 star, and I suggest you color its swatch the “apparent” color it would appear to our naked eye were we seeing it as just another bright star in our night sky. This means it would appear the same as Capella.

Binocular and telescope users can see many double stars, and some of these provide striking color contrast, such as the blue and gold of Albireo. Seeing two stars close together that are of different colors makes it even easier to see star colors but also presents a whole new set of challenges, and experienced observers frequently differ on what the colors of the double stars are. John Nanson has explored this in an excellent post to the “Star Splitters” blog that we co-author. To learn more about these stars and the special challenges of determining their colors, read John’s post here.

What we can surmise from the colors

As you can see from the temperature scale, blue stars are hot – red stars are “cool.” Cool, that is, as far as star temperatures go. They are still very, very hot: 3700 Kelvin is about 6,200 degrees Fahrenheit! (Steel melts at about half that temperature.)

So once you notice a star’s color, what more can it tell you about the star? A detailed answer is beyond this exercise, but it means you can make a very good guess about some other important characteristics of the star.

Here’s a summary in table form of what the spectral classification tells about the size and life expectancy of a star, and even hints at how it will probably die.

  • Ninety-five percent of all stars are on what is called the “main sequence.” Most of the stars that are not on the main sequence are white dwarfs. But a few others are giants or supergiants. Roughly one percent of the stars fall into one of the giant categories, such as Antares.
  • The lower limit for the mass of a star is 1/80th the mass of our Sun – or about 13 times the mass of Jupiter.
  • Temperatures are for a star’s surface. The interior is much hotter.
  • Age – “O” stars have short lives and thus die first, then “B,” etc. No “dwarf” “K” or “M” star has died yet – the universe isn’t old enough.

Look East: April brings the World’s Fair Star and Saturn!

I Click image for larger view.

Arcturus isn’t universally known as the “World’s Fair Star,” but it should be. Its light bridged two World’s Fairs , making a physical link between the one in 1893 and a second 1933 – both held in Chicago. It’s intriguing that the general public was excited enough about science – in the middle of the Great Depression – to make such a link attractive to the Fair’s promoters. Light from Arcturus – believed at that time to be 40 light years away – was captured by the 40-inch refractor at Yerkes Observatory and used to turn on the lights for the 1933 Fair.

This put the public spotlight not only on Arcturus, but it raised consciousness about the vast distance between us and that star, since the light being used had started its journey during the 1893 Fair and arrived just in time to start the next Fair. When you know light can circle the Earth more than seven times in a single second, you start to understand just what an incredible journey that was.

Of course Arcturus has many other distinctions. For one thing, it makes a perfect connection with the best known asterism in the sky, the Big Dipper. To find it, all you have to remember is “follow the arc to Arcturus.” That should keep you from confusing it with the brightest “star” in our eastern sky shortly after sunset on these April nights – the ringed planet Saturn. Saturn will be higher and to the south of Arcturus. Even binoculars won’t reveal the rings, however – for that you need a small telescope. Here’s the chart.

The name "Arcturus" derives from Ancient Greek and means "Guardian of the Bear." It is the brightest star in the constellation Boötes. Click image for much larger version. (Chart derived from Starry Nights screen shot.)

Click here to download a printer-friendly version of this chart.

Another way to remember where to find Arcturus is its name, derived from ancient Greek, which can be translated as “Bear Watcher.” That’s because Arcturus looks like it’s keeping an eye on the “Great Bear,” Ursa Major, as both circle the northern pole.

You can also think of the magnitude system by which we rate the brightness of stars as starting near Arcturus. At magnitude -.04 it’s very close to zero. Its absolute magnitude is also pretty close to zero since absolute magnitude is defined as how bright a star would be if it were about 33 light years from us, and Arcturus is actually about 37.6 light years from us. That makes its absolute magnitude -.29.

Arcturus has the distinction of being the brightest star in the northern celestial hemisphere, but this is splitting hairs in several ways. It means it’s the brightest star north of the celestial equator. Sirius, now over in the southwest, is obviously brighter. But Sirius is south of the celestial equator. Both stars are located close enough to the celestial equator so they can be seen from most places on Earth.

But Arcturus (-.04) also wins this “brightest star in the northern hemisphere” distinction by another hair. Remember that the lower the magnitude number, the brighter the star. Both Vega (.03) and Capella (.08) are north of the celestial equator, and the difference in brightness between Arcturus (-.04), Vega (.03), and Capella (.08) is only a tad more than a tenth of a magnitude. For practical purposes, they all look the same. But in practical terms, making the comparison by naked eye is – well – very impractical. Capella is currently fairly high in the northwest. But next month, when Vega is high enough in the east to see well, Capella will be rather low in the northwest. At that time Arcturus should look brighter – but its actual brightness will be aided by the fact that it is high over head at that time, so you are seeing it while looking through a lot less air than you will be when looking at Vega or Capella. Besides, visually trying to compare stars that are this far apart is next to impossible. I simply think of all three as magnitude zero and leave the hair splitting to the scientists and their instruments.

Oops – we interrupt this program for a bulletin from 1907!

Yes, having just written how impractical the naked eye comparison is, I found this passage in “The Friendly Stars” by Martha Evans Martin, a book that was published more than a century ago:

Arcturus and Capella are so nearly equal in brightness that astronomers differ as to which outranks the other, even when they measure their light with a supposedly accurate instrument and a trained eye. To my own eye Arcturus outshines Capella, and on asking various inexperienced persons for off-hand opinions as to the relative brightness of the two stars, I have invariably had an answer in favor of Arcturus. The best authorities, however, make Capella a shade brighter.

Oh my! And now with 100 years of scientific progress, the verdict is that Martha Evans Martin and her causal observer friends were correct – and the “best authorities” wrong. Arcturus is the brightest. So much for my idea that you can’t tell the difference with the naked eye! Give it a try and see what you think. (You can find a chart for Capella and more details about that star in this post.)

Since we’re ranking stars, however, Arcturus is actually fourth on the list of brightest stars – two others that are ahead of it, Canopus and Rigel Kentaurus, are not seen by observers in mid-northern latitudes.

While Arcturus radiates a lot of energy, much of it is not in the form of visible light. It has what’s known as a “peculiar spectrum” and radiates much of its energy in the infrared portion of the spectrum. This means that to our eyes it doesn’t look as bright as it really is.

One more deception of sorts: This brightness is not because Arcturus is so big – well , yes it is, but not big in terms of the amount of stuff in it, but big in terms of surface area. If you’re measuring the amount of stuff that makes up Arcturus – its mass – it is about the same size as our Sun. But Arcturus has a much greater surface area, so think of it as a hugely bloated version of our Sun. (Keep that in mind when you look at the comparison sketch on the left.) It is a much older star and is now going through its red giant phase – something our Sun will probably do several billion years from now, burning the Earth to a cinder in the process.

Vital stats for Arcturus, also know as Alpha Bootes:

• Brilliance: Magnitude -.04 , brightest star in the celestial northern hemisphere; shines with the luminosity of 215 Suns.
• Distance: 37 light years
• Spectral Type: K1 Giant
• Position: 14h:15m:38s, +19°:10′:5

Guideposts reminder

Each month you’re encouraged to learn the new “guidepost” stars and asterisms rising in the east about an hour after sunset. One reason for doing this is so you can then see how they move in the following months. So if you have been following – even if this is just your second month – look for the previous guidepost stars and asterisms that you have learned and that are still with us in April. Here’s the list from east to west.

Arcturus, Leo’s Rump (triangle), The Sickle, Regulus, the Beehive, Mars, Procyon, Sirius, Pollux, Castor, Betelegeuse, Orion’s Belt, Rigel, Capella, the Kite, Aldebaran, the Winter Hexagon, the Pleiades. Venus is our bright “evening star” in the west, followed by Mercury which, as usual, plays hard to get. (For when, where ,and how to find Mercury, see the “Events” posting for April. For our northern guideposts, see “Look North” for April.

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